Judo Videos

History of Judo: USJA President Gary Goltz Discusses How Judo Intersects With Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu and Mixed Martial Arts

Judo authority Gary Goltz, photographed for Black Belt magazine.In this exclusive Q&A video, USJA president and CEO Gary Goltz talks with Black Belt Editor-in-Chief Robert W. Young about how the history of judo techniques intersect with the history and techniques of Brazilian jiu-jitsu and mixed martial arts.

Black Belt: What do judo people think of Brazilian jiu-jitsu? Do you think it’s a subset of judo? Do you think it’s judo for the NHB arena?

USJA President Gary Goltz: Well, if you look at judo historically, we used to have a lot more ground work prior to ’64, when judo went into the Olympics. We realized that more people want to see the stand-up judo, the action. It’s one of the reasons we now have the blue and the white gi, so you can see the two opponents.

USJA President Gary Goltz Discusses the History of Judo and How It’s Currently Being Impacted by Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu and Mixed Martial Arts

USJA President Gary Goltz (continued): The rules are, more and more, going toward forcing the players to do stand-up judo as opposed to doing more like wrestling/Brazilian jiu-jitsu-type moves — leg grabs, things of that sort. On the ground, we allow the opponents to do ground work to the point where, if they get into a stalemate — which is pretty common in UFC cage matches — we would tell them to stand back up.

Learn judo moves from another great judo master
in this FREE REPORT — The Neil Adams Guide to Judo Throws!

Black Belt: What does the judo community think of the MMA explosion? Are you seeing good technique or is it just a bunch of guys pounding each other without any real skill?

USJA President Gary Goltz: [Mixed martial arts] has grown with age. Those first UFCs … had some really top judo people in it. I think it immediately established grappling/jujitsu/judo as a really important martial art — particularly those first UFCs where the karate guys tended to get taken to the ground, strangled out, armbarred [and] thrown.

Now I think what you’ve seen is that everyone is cross-training a lot more so that ground-work skills and their ability to escape the guard and continue is much better and the striking has now come back. So I think it shows the importance of knowing both. MMA had a very positive effect on judo. When the Brazilian jiu-jitsu [guys] and [Royce] Gracie first started doing it, judo really came back up right away.

For more information on the U.S. Judo Association (USJA) visit usja-judo.org.…

Learn the “Juji Squish Roll” From Judo Player and MMA Fighter Ronda Rousey!

In this exclusive martial arts video, Ronda Rousey demonstrates what she calls the “Juji Squish Roll” judo technique. Ronda Rousey was the first female judoka to win a medal at the World Championships since 1995 and was one of the youngest medalists at the 2007 World Judo Championships. At 17, Ronda Rousey qualified for her first Olympic team, becoming the youngest judo player in the entire Olympic Games. Learn more about Ronda Rousey at her Team USA judo profile page.

Olympic Judoka Ronda Rousey Demonstrates the “Juji Squish Roll”

Although many Olympic judo players come from “judo families,” Ronda Rousey’s family, in fact, is one of the most pedigreed. Ronda Rousey’s mother, AnnMaria R. DeMars, Ph.D., was the first American to win the World Judo Championships. At age 11, Ronda Rousey persuaded her mother to let her pursue judo. At first, AnnMaria R. DeMars was hesitant in allowing her daughter to try judo, but Ronda Rousey exceeded all expectations and has risen through the ranks in an unprecedented fashion.

After claiming the top finish for the U.S. women at the Olympic Games, Ronda Rousey became only the second U.S. athlete to win a gold medal at the 2004 World Junior Judo Championships in Budapest, Hungary.

In April 2006, Ronda Rousey became the first U.S. female athlete in nearly 10 years to win an A-Level event, going 5-0 to claim gold at the Birmingham World Cup in Great Britain. Later that year, the then-19-year-old won the bronze medal at the Junior World Championships, becoming the first U.S. athlete to win two medals at the Junior World Championships.

On March 27, 2011, Ronda Rousey made her mixed martial arts debut at a King of the Cage event at the Braemar Country Club in Tarzana, California. Her first MMA opponent was Brazilian Ediane “India” Gomes, a 6-1-0 favorite going in. Ronda Rousey submitted her at the 25-second mark of the first round!

According to Ronda Rousey’s Wikipedia page, her MMA record stands at 9-0, with her most-recent win being at UFC 170 against Sara McMann by TKO. Ronda Rousey is currently the UFC women’s bantamweight champion. Learn more about Ronda Rousey at her official website, rondamma.com.

Ronda Rousey Featured in Judo / MMA Book!

Winning on the Ground, a judo and MMA book featuring Ronda Rousey and Kayla Harrison.Winning on the Ground: Training and Techniques for Judo and MMA Fighters (book) — Dr. AnnMaria De Mars (1984 world judo champion) and James Pedro Sr. (coach of international judo medalists) present a variety of techniques developed over the years. Their coaching has helped such winners in the worlds of judo and mixed martial arts as Ronda Rousey (De Mars’ daughter) and Kayla Harrison take home medals at the highest levels of competition.…

Gary Goltz Demonstrates a Hybridized Judo-Aikido Self-Defense Kata

Judo techniques expert Gary Goltz“Kata means prearranged form,” explains 7th-dan judo master Gary Goltz, president and CEO of the United States Judo Association. “In karate, they have lots of prearranged forms where the individual practitioner does different patterns with the hands, with the feet, in combination. In judo, our prearranged forms obviously involve an opponent.”

And in this video demonstration recorded in one of Black Belt’s photo studios, Gary Goltz and his training opponent seamlessly carry out a sequence of self-defense moves that incorporate techniques from two arts, actually: judo and aikido.

Gary Goltz Demonstrates a Memorized Sequence of Self-Defense Techniques in a Judo/Aikido Kata Called Goshin-Jitsu

“We have kata for throws, we have kata for holding techniques, and this particular one focuses on self-defense,” Gary Goltz continues. “[This sequence] is prearranged to show … a large variety of attacks and to show the versatility of the judoka to handle a person, be it armed or unarmed. Either way, judo, while most people think of it as an Olympic sport, it’s still based in the martial arts, rooted in jujitsu, and [is] a very formidable form of self-defense.”

In discussing the genesis of this form, called goshin-jitsu, Gary Goltz delves into some martial arts history: “[Goshin-jitsu is] a kata that was invented in the late 1950s at the request of the Air Force. They went to the Kodokan and asked that the Kodokan make a form that would be more relative to modern combat as opposed to things like the samurai with the swords and kneeling like you’re doing a tea ceremony.

More judo insights available in these two FREE downloads!
1. The Neil Adams Guide to Judo Throws and 2. Ronda Rousey: An Exclusive Interview With the Gene LeBell Protégé, Olympic Judo Medalist and MMA Fighter

“So [Kenji] Tomiki, who was one of the Kodokan’s top people — who was also very skilled in aikido — developed this form, and it really develops judo and aikido as one art. You can really see the similarities and how they blend. A lot of the moves, you can’t really tell if it’s judo or if it’s aikido.”

Stopping short of listing all the judo techniques and aikido techniques that form this hybridized self-defense sequence, Gary Goltz gives a general breakdown: “[This kata] has several sections. The first section is the unarmed techniques. The second section is holds. The third section is strikes, and then the last three sections are weapons — first with a knife, then with a staff (we use a pipe; it looks more dramatic), and finally the gun. So it kind of progresses to the ultimate weapon.”


Kayla Harrison Shows You Judo’s Ouchi Gari (Major Inner Reaping Throw) Technique

Kayla Harrison has studied judo with two-time Olympic medalist and 1999 world judo champ Jimmy Pedro since she was 16. At age 20, she stepped onto the World Judo Championships mat in Tokyo in September 2010. It had been more than a decade since the United States had produced a world judo champion and more than a quarter-century since that champion was a woman. While such pressure may have psyched out a lesser judo player, Kayla Harrison got in there and brought home the United States’ fourth world-championship judo gold medal.

And then, of course, she went on to win the United States’ first gold medal in judo during the 2012 Summer Olympics in London!

Before her historic Olympic win, Kayla Harrison visited Black Belt’s photo studio in December 2010 and shared with us some of her winning judo techniques! In this segment, she demonstrates her usage of the ouchi gari, or major inner reaping throw.

Kayla Harrison Demonstrates the Ouchi Gari (Major Inner Reaping Throw)

“In judo, there are three major parts to a throw,” Kayla Harrison explains. “The first part, the kuzushi, or the off-balance, for ouchi gari is … I’m going to snap my opponent forward. This is going to get him thinking that I’m trying to throw him forward, and in return, he’s going to react by pulling backward.

“The second part of the throw, or the entry — the tsukuri — I’m going to step with my right foot right in between his feet, followed by my left foot stepping right behind that foot. So it’s going to be almost like a T.

Get inside the mind of Olympic judoka Ronda Rousey in this FREE download!
Ronda Rousey: An Exclusive Interview With the Gene LeBell Protégé,
Olympic Judo Medalist and MMA Fighter

“The third step, for the finish — the kake — I’m going to push his elbow in and my forearm is gonna go right into his body. And as I do this motion, I’m going to hook his leg and make a circular motion.”

Kayla Harrison then proceeds to throw her somewhat unfortunate judo partner to the hard studio floor several times, but all can rest assured that he emerged from the ordeal unscathed.

Winning on the Ground, a judo and MMA book featuring Ronda Rousey and Kayla Harrison, written by AnnMaria De Mars and James Pedro Sr.To see more of Kayla Harrison, along with MMA champ Ronda Rousey, in action, purchase a copy of Winning on the Ground: Training and Techniques for Judo and MMA Fighters. The book is written by Dr. AnnMaria De Mars (1984 world judo champion) and James Pedro Sr. (coach of international judo medalists).

Winning on the Ground includes detailed discussion of the following:

  • six secrets to better mat work (and mistakes to avoid)
  • coaching tips from the authors
  • a dozen quick ways to gain an opponent’s submission
  • how to do the perfect armbar and half nelson
  • smarter training: drills for connecting techniques for the win


Judo Videos: Sankaku-Jime Demonstrated by Ronda Rousey, MMA Fighter and Olympic Judoka

Talk about a Cinderella story! A baby girl squirms inside her mother’s womb, inadvertently wrapping her umbilical cord around her neck. Suffering from a lack of oxygen, she clings to life long enough to emerge into the world and be freed from the entanglement. She doesn’t speak until she’s 6 years old. Meanwhile, her dad constantly reminds her, “You’re a sleeper — you’ll show everybody.”

That “sleeper” was, of course, Ronda Rousey: MMA fighter and Olympic judoka known throughout the martial arts world for her impressive judo techniques (such as the sankaku-jime, demonstrated in the video below) and formidable MMA skills.

Her proficiency in judo moves (such as the customized “Juji Squishi Roll” and her take on the Cuban sankaku-jime) began to take shape at age 10, when she fell in love with absorbing judo info.

Ronda Rousey, MMA Fighter and Olympic Judoka, Demonstrates a Modified Sankaku-Jime (Triangle Choke)

Read Stephen Quadros’ EXCLUSIVE interview with Ronda in this FREE download!
Ronda Rousey: An Exclusive Interview With the Gene LeBell Protégé,
Olympic Judo Medalist and MMA Fighter

Fast-forward to 2008: Standing on the dais at the Beijing Olympics, Ronda Rousey, now 21, has a bronze medal draped around her neck. She’s the first American woman to take home any Olympic medal in judo.

Her father was right: Ronda Rousey’s career has garnered accolades such as a world judo championship, record-creating Olympic performances, the Strikeforce bantamweight championship and induction into the Black Belt Hall of Fame as the 2008 Judoka of the Year.

For the May 2012 issue of Black Belt, Ronda Rousey sat down with us for a candid interview about judo moves and filmed several online judo videos, such as the sankaku-jime video featured on this page.

In celebration of judo in the 2012 Olympic Games, here are a couple of Olympic-related Q&A excerpts from her interview:

RONDA ROUSEY — MMA FIGHTER AND OLYMPIC JUDOKA — ON WHETHER THE OLYMPIC DREAM WAS ALWAYS THERE OR CAME ABOUT AFTER YEARS OF TRAINING: “It was definitely always there,” Ronda Rousey says. “I was born with my umbilical cord around my neck and suffered from hypoxia. I didn’t talk or anything until I was 6 years old. My dad was behind me the whole time: He was like, “You’re a sleeper — you’ll show everybody.” You know how your parents always tell you you’re going to win the Olympics or become president? Well, he said I was going to win the Olympics in swimming one day, and that was it. It was instilled into my head from the beginning: You can do whatever you want, but you should do it to become the best at it.”

Did you enjoy learning about sankaku-jime from Ronda Rousey?
Learn judo moves from another great judo master in this FREE download!
The Neil Adams Guide to Judo Throws

RONDA ROUSEY — JUDO VIDEOS PERSONALITY AND JUDO MOVES EXPERT — ON WHAT IT WAS LIKE TO COMPETE IN THE OLYMPIC GAMES: “There was a big difference between my first Olympics and my second one,” Ronda Rousey says. “For the first one, I didn’t even expect to make the team. I kind of slipped in at the last minute. I was awe-struck because I’d never been to a tournament that size. By the time I went to my second Olympics, I’d gotten second at the World Championships and won the Pan-American Games, so I was more used to it. I was more focused.

“It’s awesome being in the [Olympic] Village. It’s kind of like being in limbo: The second you get there, it feels like it was a million years ago when you were anywhere else. And the second you leave, it feels like it was a million years ago when you were there. [The Village] is its own little world where your food and your lodging are all taken care of. And I fought in the first week, so I had the whole rest of the month to be like, What do you want to do now?

Also, all the athletes, no matter how famous they are, have to stay in the Village. I’d be like, ‘That’s Kobe Bryant!’ or ‘That’s Michael Phelps!'”

More Ronda Rousey MMA!
Visit the Ronda Rousey MMA homepage at rondamma.com!
If Ronda Rousey’s sankaku-jime demonstration piqued your interest, check out more judo videos and judo info from BlackBeltMag.com!