Keiko Fukuda, the first female judoka to be awarded the rank of 10th-degree black belt, died February 9, 2013, in San Francisco. She was 99.

Keiko Fukuda, the first female judoka to be awarded the rank of 10th-degree black belt, died February 9, 2013, in San Francisco. She was 99. USA Judo, the national governing body for the Olympic sport in the United States, awarded Fukuda her 10th dan in 2011. Afterward, she said, “This is a dream come true.” Two years earlier, she was inducted into the Black Belt Hall of Fame as Judoka of the Year in honor of her lifelong commitment to the art. The last surviving student of judo founder Jigoro Kano, Fukuda long ago chose the mat over marriage. Following Kano’s wishes, she moved to the United States in 1966 to help spread the grappling art. She became a leader in women’s rights, both by example and by voice, as she broke through the glass ceiling that had prevented her from ascending in rank. Fukuda’s storied life is the subject of a documentary titled Mrs. Judo: Be Strong, Be Gentle, Be Beautiful. To watch the trailer, visit the Mrs. Judo page.

Black Belt Magazine has a storied history that dates back all the way to 1961, making 2021 the 60th Anniversary of the world's leading magazine of martial arts. To celebrate six decades of legendary martial arts coverage, take a trip down memory lane by scrolling through some of the most influential covers ever published. From the creators of martial art styles, to karate tournament heroes, to superstars on the silver screen, and everything in between, the iconic covers of Black Belt Magazine act as a time capsule for so many important moments and figures in martial arts history. Keep reading to view the full list of these classic issues.

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The vast majority of McGregor's income came from the sale of his whiskey company, Proper No. Twelve, for $150 million. Along with various endorsement deals which brought his out of competition total income to $158 million, it made McGregor one of only four athletes in history to have earned more than $70 million off the field while still actively competing. McGregor also raked in $22 million for his sole fight of the past year, a knockout loss to Dustin Poirier in January.

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