Jon Foo Stars in Bangkok Revenge: The Best Martial Arts Movie Since Ong-Bak?

Is the new Jon Foo film, Bangkok Revenge, set to be the best martial arts movie since the Tony Jaa movie Ong-Bak? That's what Karate Bushido magazine is saying! Directed by Jean-Marc Mineo,Bangkok Revenge stars Jon Foo, an Irish-Chinese actor who began his martial arts training in London before moving to Hong Kong to work with the Jackie Chanstunt team and Yuen Woo-ping. Jon Foo previously appeared inThe Protector with Tony Jaa, as well as Tekken,Universal Soldiers: Regeneration, Street Fighter: Legacy and Rebirth


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In Bangkok Revenge, Jon Foo plays a character named Manit, who witnesses the murder of his parents when he's 10 years old. The criminals attempt to kill the boy by shooting him in the head, but he survives. However, the resulting damage to his brain leaves him unable to experience normal human emotions.

A martial arts master takes in the youth and mentors him. Twenty years later, his combat skills honed to a fine edge, Manit returns to the scene of the crime in search of justice.

Bangkok Revenge will hit theaters September 14, 2012.

In the meantime, check out the trailer:

JON FOO MARTIAL ARTS MOVIE TRAILER Jon Foo Stars in New Martial Arts Movie, Bangkok Revenge

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