She won the United States' first Olympic gold medal in judo, and now Kayla Harrison shares with you how to execute one of her favorite judo techniques in this Black Belt video exclusive!

Kayla Harrison has studied judo with two-time Olympic medalist and 1999 world judo champ Jimmy Pedro since she was 16. At age 20, she stepped onto the World Judo Championships mat in Tokyo in September 2010. It had been more than a decade since the United States had produced a world judo champion and more than a quarter-century since that champion was a woman. While such pressure may have psyched out a lesser judo player, Kayla Harrison got in there and brought home the United States' fourth world-championship judo gold medal. And then, of course, she went on to win the United States' first gold medal in judo during the 2012 Summer Olympics in London! Before her historic Olympic win, Kayla Harrison visited Black Belt's photo studio in December 2010 and shared with us some of her winning judo techniques! In this segment, she demonstrates her usage of the ouchi gari, or major inner reaping throw.


JUDO TECHNIQUE VIDEO Kayla Harrison Demonstrates the Ouchi Gari (Major Inner Reaping Throw)

"In judo, there are three major parts to a throw," Kayla Harrison explains. "The first part, the kuzushi, or the off-balance, for ouchi gari is ... I'm going to snap my opponent forward. This is going to get him thinking that I'm trying to throw him forward, and in return, he's going to react by pulling backward. "The second part of the throw, or the entry -- the tsukuri -- I'm going to step with my right foot right in between his feet, followed by my left foot stepping right behind that foot. So it's going to be almost like a T.

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"The third step, for the finish — the kake — I'm going to push his elbow in and my forearm is gonna go right into his body. And as I do this motion, I'm going to hook his leg and make a circular motion." Kayla Harrison then proceeds to throw her somewhat unfortunate judo partner to the hard studio floor several times, but all can rest assured that he emerged from the ordeal unscathed. To see more of Kayla Harrison, along with MMA champ Ronda Rousey, in action, purchase a copy of Winning on the Ground: Training and Techniques for Judo and MMA Fighters. The book is written by Dr. AnnMaria De Mars (1984 world judo champion) and James Pedro Sr. (coach of international judo medalists). Winning on the Ground includes detailed discussion of the following:
  • six secrets to better mat work (and mistakes to avoid)
  • coaching tips from the authors
  • a dozen quick ways to gain an opponent’s submission
  • how to do the perfect armbar and half nelson
  • smarter training: drills for connecting techniques for the win
... AND MORE!

Black Belt Magazine has a storied history that dates back all the way to 1961, making 2021 the 60th Anniversary of the world's leading magazine of martial arts. To celebrate six decades of legendary martial arts coverage, take a trip down memory lane by scrolling through some of the most influential covers ever published. From the creators of martial art styles, to karate tournament heroes, to superstars on the silver screen, and everything in between, the iconic covers of Black Belt Magazine act as a time capsule for so many important moments and figures in martial arts history. Keep reading to view the full list of these classic issues.

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