Have I ever shared with you my favorite part of working at Black Belt? It’s that I get to learn from the world’s best instructors. If I’ve got a question about developing situational awareness, all I have to do is pick up the phone and Kelly McCann will teach me how to identify potential threats. If I need help perfecting a choke, I can drive down to “Judo” Gene LeBell’s studio and he’ll show me how to lock it in so tightly that it feels like my neck is caught in a bear trap. How cool is that? I want to give you the same opportunities to learn from the legends. I knew Richard Bustillo would be visiting us, so I asked our Facebook fans what questions they would present to the jeet kune do master.


Want to learn more about Bruce Lee? Download our FREE guide—Bruce Lee's Biography and the Birth of Tao of Jeet Kune Do.

Here are some of our favorite questions you asked, along with Richard Bustillo’s responses. Gary Castleberry: What is the single most important thing you learned from sifu Lee? And do you consider JKD a concept of what a complete martial art should be or a style within itself? Richard Bustillo: The most important thing I've learned from Bruce Lee is honesty. Every individual should honestly think for himself/herself, accepting only what works for himself/herself that makes good practical sense. The individual is more important than any style or system. Jeet kune do is Bruce Lee's personable approach to fighting for survival in an uncontrolled situation. His art is founded upon body mechanics, simplicity, effectiveness and adaptability. It is based on his concepts, principles, philosophies and personal training methods.[read more] Brian Garrett: How would Bruce do in the UFC? Richard Bustillo: Bruce Lee would love the MMA in UFC. His [goal was] to be well-rounded in all the combative ranges of martial arts. I truly believe Bruce Lee would adapt his training to the grappling arts of wrestling/jiu-jitsu and win in his weight class, in his time. Remember, Bruce Lee would be 70 years old today. Java Bomani: Other than Bruce Lee, what single individual had the most influence in shaping your martial life? Richard Bustillo: Dan Inosanto was instrumental in my martial arts growth. For 20 years I was his training partner, assistant, business partner, apprentice and best friend. However, if it weren't for Bruce Lee, there would be no Dan Inosanto.

Dr. Craig's Martial Arts Movie Lounge

When The Fast and the Furious (2001) sped into the psyche's of illegal street racing enthusiasts, with a penchant for danger and the psychotic insanity of arrant automotive adventure, the brusque bearish, quasi-hero rebel, Dominic "Dom" Toretto was caustic yet salvationally portrayed with the power of a train using a Vin Diesel engine.

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Japan continued its dominance of judo at the Olympics Wednesday as Chizuru Arai added yet another gold medal to the host country's haul defeating Austria's Michaela Polleres to capture the women's 70 kg class at Tokyo's esteemed Nippon Budokan arena. After choking Madina Taimazova unconscious to win a 16 minute, overtime marathon contest in the semifinals, Arai hit a foot sweep for a half point in regulation time to beat Polleres in the finals and take the gold.

On the men's side, Georgia's Lasha Bekauri returned from a shoulder injury at last month's world championships winning the 90 kg title by scoring a half point throw on Germany's Eduard Trippel in the finals.

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You can be as prepared as ever and still not get the results you had wanted or expected. You can put your heart into every training session, just to lose. The truth is when you step onto the mat the numerical results are out of your control. Sometimes, as mentioned, you can train harder than you ever have, hit a "near perfect" form and still lose. Ironically other times, you can run a form that you didn't think was your strongest with a few slight missteps and still win. Part of having a competitor IQ means that you can assess yourself and your performances realistically and make the proper changes, if any, (but there always are) moving forward to the next tournament. I'm going to share my evaluation process between tournaments down below:

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