Jackie Chan Movies

SHINJUKU INCIDENT with Jackie Chan – Sneak Peek!

This is an exclusive BLACKBELTMAG.COM preview clip for Sony Pictures Home Entertainment’s June 8, 2010 DVD release of SHINJUKU INCIDENT, starring martial arts legend Jackie Chan in the story of one man’s revenge against Tokyo’s criminal underworld. See the full trailer here! Shinjuku Incident is priced at $24.94 and is available for pre-order today through Sony Pictures Entertainment.

Jackie Chan in Shinjuku Incident (DVD Trailer)

From Sony Pictures Home Entertainment comes the exciting June 8, 2010, DVD release of Shinjuku Incident, starring martial arts legend Jackie Chan in the story of one man’s revenge against Tokyo’s criminal underworld. Chan plays Steelhead, a Chinese laborer who comes to Japan hoping for a better life. Unable to find honest work and bullied into the shadows with is fellow immigrants, he soon finds himself ascending as the boss of a black market mob. After providing a deadly service to a powerful yakuza crime boss, Steelhead’s rise to mafia power spirals rapidly out of control as he’s given reign over the dangerous and lucrative Shinjuku district.

Jackie Chan in The Karate Kid – Film Trailer

This 2010 feature from Columbia Pictures features Jaden Smith as 12-year-old Dre Parker and martial arts action legend Jackie Chan as Dre’s kung fu teacher, Mr. Han. This update of the 1984 classic is set in Beijing, China, and will reportedly borrow elements of the original plot, wherein a bullied youth learns to stand up for himself with the help of an eccentric mentor. As Han teaches Dre that kung fu is not about punches and parries, but maturity and calm, Dre realizes that facing down the bullies will be the fight of his life.

Vintage Martial Arts Movies: Chop Socky

Finally, a movie featuring Jackie Chan, Jet Li, Sammo Hung and director John Woo on the same screen has arrived.

While Chop Socky: Cinema Hong Kong isn’t a big-budget blockbuster, it’s an engaging documentary that explores the many facets of kung fu films by showing archival footage, analyzing fight scenes and interviewing the aforementioned stars. It accurately chronicles the genre and intersperses clips from classics such as The One-Armed Swordsman. While it doesn’t have the creativity or drama of some other documentaries, this Independent Film Channel production is far better looking than most. It packs a punch you’ll definitely feel, whether you’re a genre guru or an action neophyte.

After noting the recent international appeal of Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon and the Kill Bill movies, writer-director Ian Taylor explains that the first Chinese action flicks were filmed in Shanghai during the 1920s and based on wu xia (period-piece kung fu) novels. Eventually, productions migrated south to China’s most famous island.

For even more kung fu movie trivia, check out with our FREE guide—Our Bruce Lee Movies List: Little-Known Trivia From Bruce Lee’s Pictures.

Impressively, Chop Socky shows 50-year-old clips of an important Hong Kong actor who’s usually neglected in other documentaries: Kwan Tak-Hing. Tak-Hing Kwan portrayed the real-life folk hero Wong Fei Hung in more than 70 films and paved the way for Jet Li to play the character in the Once Upon a Time in China series.

The documentary then highlights the more contemporary movies, from swordplay epics of the ’60s to international blockbusters starring Jackie Chan and Jet Li. It also features interviews with screen legends like Crouching Tiger villainess Cheng Pei Pei, Spiritual Boxer director Lau Ka Leung and Kill Bill co-star Gordon Liu.

However, Chop Socky isn’t without its faults. First, its 55-minute running time isn’t enough to encapsulate the entire genre. Second, it could use a more powerful narrator, like Star Trek’s George Takei, whose booming voice highlights the Bruce Lee documentary Curse of the Dragon. Finally, it glosses over Bruce Lee’s global influence and focuses only on his hyper-realistic fight choreography.

They’re minor flaws, however, and the rest of Chop Socky more than makes up for them. For example, Jackie Chan hilariously remembers the manic search to replace the Little Dragon: “There was Bruce Le, Bruce Li, Bruce Table, Bruce Chair—everything Bruce!” It was in that post-Bruce Lee era that Jackie Chan revitalized the genre by becoming his hero’s antithesis. Out of Bruce Lee’s onscreen superman sprang Jackie Chan’s kung fu clown.

It’s such key moments in Hong Kong cinema that this documentary nails perfectly—and for that, Chop Socky is definitely worth watching.…

Vintage Martial Arts Movies: Jackie Chan and Jet Li in The Forbidden Kingdom

Jackie Chan. Jet Li. In the same movie. ‘Nuff said, right?

Well, not quite. But fans of “J&J” (Jackie Chan and Jet Li, as the studio calls them) have waited to hear those eight words in the same sentence for 25 years, and all it took was the director of Stuart Little and the writer of Spirit: Stallion of the Cimarron to make The Forbidden Kingdom happen. “Say again?” you might ask.

Yep. Director Rob Minkoff and screenwriter John Fusco spearhead the movie that not only brings the globe’s two biggest martial arts icons together on-screen for the first time but also adapts elements of China’s most famous novel, Journey to the West. Not Asian filmmaking legends like Tsui Hark or Ang Lee. Not even Hollywood action experts like James Cameron or the Wachowski brothers. Instead, it’s John Fusco (who wrote a cartoon about talking horses) and Rob Minkoff (whose claim to fame is bringing E.B. White’s children’s novel to life).

Find out which Bruce Lee movie Jackie Chan appeared in by downloading our FREE guide—Our Bruce Lee Movies List: Little-Known Trivia From Bruce Lee’s Pictures.

That’s not a knock against the filmmakers or Forbidden Kingdom. But Rob Minkoff and John Fusco certainly gloss over a lot of Chinese mythology with a fine layer of Hollywood queso.

Fortunately, the pair crafts a simple, family friendly fantasy and lets the real behind-the-camera talent shine: action director Yuen Woo-ping. His dazzling fight choreography makes Jackie Chan and Jet Li look more deadly than they have in years despite being in their mid-50s and 40s, respectively. Yuen Woo-ping unwittingly started the “wire fu” fad in the West by staging fights for two of the last great martial arts movies of the 20th century: The Matrix and Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon. For the next half decade, Hollywood imitated him, often with laughable results. Now, the master of movie combat takes back his style from the poseurs who turned wushu wire work into a cliché.

With Yuen Woo-ping’s help, the two screen legends don’t just drop kicks in their duel; they drop jaws with a martial buffet of high-flying strikes, intricate hand techniques and various Shaolin styles. Praying mantis, tiger claw, stunt-wire-infused kung fu—Yuen’s got it all playing to each actor’s strengths. As the Silent Monk, Jet Li spins, twists and flies with a grace not seen since his Once Upon a Time in China days. Meanwhile, Jackie Chan and Yuen Woo-ping pay homage to their 1978 Drunken Master classic by having Jackie Chan dish out some intoxicated kung fu comedy as Lu Yan, a drunkard who happens to be an immortal warrior. It’s a beautiful thing to watch their contrasting styles meld like yin and yang in a lethal on-screen ballet.

Unfortunately, Forbidden Kingdom loses some of its action cachet for featuring too much chi kung magic in the climactic set piece. It’s disappointing to see Jet Li and the villain (played by Collin Chou) shoot fireballs at each other like Dragon Ball Z wannabes. Why rely on CGI special effects for thrills when there are two action icons and a fabulous martial artist in Collin Chou?

The flick’s biggest weakness is its watered-down story. While John Fusco, a real-life martial artist, sprinkles the script with odes to Chinese movie classics and references to jeet kune do and Taoism, he panders too much to demographics. He underestimates the mainstream fans’ understanding of other cultures, forgetting that it was the average American moviegoer who helped pump up Crouching Tiger to Oscar-winning status with more than $125 million at the U.S. box office.

In an unnecessary effort to have audiences relate to Chinese mythology, John Fusco and Rob Minkoff shift the spotlight off J&J and onto Jason (played by Michael Angarano), an American teenager who gets sucked into ancient China when he finds the staff of the Monkey King, a mischievous deity who’s been imprisoned by the evil Jade Warlord (Collin Chou). After a second act filled with typical martial philosophy and some humorous training via Jackie Chan and Jet Li’s interactions, rivals Lu Yan and the Silent Monk predictably team up with Jason to return the staff, free the Monkey King and overthrow the Jade Warlord.

Thankfully, Michael Angarano is a rock-solid actor, and his kung fu progression in the movie is quite convincing.

Collin Chou is an on-screen gem as the Jade Warlord. Having co-starred as Li’s dad in Fearless and Donnie Yen’s nemesis in Flash Point, Collin Chou proves he’s a versatile performer with the ability to act or fight in almost any role. Too bad his demise in Forbidden Kingdom is as predictable as the sunrise.

Plus, it’s too obvious that the filmmakers carefully balanced Jackie Chan and Jet Li’s screen time for fear of offending egos. Each actor gets …