Conor McGregor Cyborg

How tough is it to fight in a sanctioned Mixed Martial Arts competition?

Well, imagine the very toughest physically demanding endeavor you have ever had to purposefully endure. Not car accident recovery or finding the odd pea hidden in a dish that ruined it, but something you have set your mind to do and then chose to follow through on. Think back-breaking, exhausting, limit-testing things. And if it is the case none of those comes to mind, the point of this writing has already been made at least in part.


Do you have it in your mind? The most grueling physical effort you have ever had to exert? Well, that would probably pale in comparison to making weight in MMA. Not fighting. Weighing in. It is hard enough to train for and engage in hand to hand combat by itself. When fighters speak of being willing to die, it is not hyperbole or theatrics. However, it is probably true that most often, the closest they have actually been to death in their careers is when cutting weight. Because it lacks the pizazz of a highlight reel spinning back fist or the photographic magnetism of a victorious combatant atop the cage shouting to whoever he is shouting at (that is illegal by the way for them to do that) – because it is not tantalizing, it is practically ignored. Except of course insofar as it threatens an event such as when UFC Welterweight Champ Kamaru Usman had to take off his Bane mask to make weight for his championship fight against Gilbert Burns or the recent fainting of Julija Stoliarenko as she took a scary fall from the scale prior to UFC Vegas 22.

There is a deeper discussion to be had about weight classes, fighter safety, cheating, long-term effects of cutting weight, etc. But at the very least, maybe the fan can do a little more in the way of respect for what fighters put on the line just to even get in the arena. Maybe before we complain about a lackluster performance or forget to consider what a short-notice weight- cut means to a fighter, we can give them their due respect for the work on the scale. I dare you to thank a fighter for making weight. Let me know what happens. It will be their first time hearing it.

UFC fighter Julija Stoliarenko faints TWICE at weigh-ins; stretchered off

Black Belt Magazine has a storied history that dates back all the way to 1961, making 2021 the 60th Anniversary of the world's leading magazine of martial arts. To celebrate six decades of legendary martial arts coverage, take a trip down memory lane by scrolling through some of the most influential covers ever published. From the creators of martial art styles, to karate tournament heroes, to superstars on the silver screen, and everything in between, the iconic covers of Black Belt Magazine act as a time capsule for so many important moments and figures in martial arts history. Keep reading to view the full list of these classic issues.

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When Black Belt Magazine was born in 1961, the Beatles were a start-up band, Sergeant Elvis Presley just left the Army, 77 Sunset Strip and Bonanza were the hot TV shows, and phone numbers started with letters. The mainstream martial art of the era was judo and the Dead Sea was just sick.

Black Belt Magazine is the martial arts' most popular and influential publication and has been so since the early 1960s when the first issues were published. From the contents of those early issues, readers recognized that honor and integrity was behind this new martial arts resource and that its objective was not just profit-making or commercialization. The 1960s work here includes three phases in Black Belt's development. Phase one spans 1961 thru 1964 prior to Black Belt becoming a monthly magazine. Phase two spans 1965 and 1966. Phase three is 1967 thru 1969.

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Matcha has got it all for a martial artist.

It creates focus, energy, concentration, curbs the appetite for weigh-ins. These are some great qualities matcha has. Learn more about matcha and how to get the best matcha to improve your health and performance.

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The quality of matcha should be vibrant or bright green. The vibrant green is called, ceremonial matcha, and is the best. It is used in very important Japanese ceremonies. Less fresh, lower grade or bad matcha will be a dark or dull green without the brightness and almost greenish yellow. Color is very important when choosing matcha. The consistency of matcha will be in a very fine powder form.

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