History of Judo: USJA President Gary Goltz Discusses How Judo Intersects With Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu and Mixed Martial Arts

What do BJJ, MMA and the history of judo have in common? U.S. Judo Association (USJA) President and CEO Gary Goltz tells you in this exclusive video!

In this exclusive Q&A video,USJA president and CEO Gary Goltztalks withBlack BeltEditor-in-Chief Robert W. Young about how the history of judo techniques intersect with the history and techniques of Brazilian jiu-jitsu and mixed martial arts. Black Belt: What do judo people think of Brazilian jiu-jitsu? Do you think it's a subset of judo? Do you think it's judo for the NHB arena?USJA President Gary Goltz:Well, if you look at judo historically, we used to have a lot more ground work prior to '64, when judo went into the Olympics. We realized that more people want to see the stand-up judo, the action. It's one of the reasons we now have the blue and the white gi, so you can see the two opponents


HISTORY OF JUDO VIDEO USJA President Gary Goltz Discusses the History of Judo and How It's Currently Being Impacted by Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu and Mixed Martial Arts

USJA President Gary Goltz (continued): The rules are, more and more, going toward forcing the players to do stand-up judo as opposed to doing more like wrestling/Brazilian jiu-jitsu-type moves — leg grabs, things of that sort. On the ground, we allow the opponents to do ground work to the point where, if they get into a stalemate — which is pretty common in UFC cage matches — we would tell them to stand back up.

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Black Belt: What does the judo community think of the MMA explosion? Are you seeing good technique or is it just a bunch of guys pounding each other without any real skill?

USJA President Gary Goltz: [Mixed martial arts] has grown with age. Those first UFCs ... had some really top judo people in it. I think it immediately established grappling/jujitsu/judo as a really important martial art — particularly those first UFCs where the karate guys tended to get taken to the ground, strangled out, armbarred [and] thrown.

Now I think what you've seen is that everyone is cross-training a lot more so that ground-work skills and their ability to escape the guard and continue is much better and the striking has now come back. So I think it shows the importance of knowing both. MMA had a very positive effect on judo. When the Brazilian jiu-jitsu [guys] and [Royce] Gracie first started doing it, judo really came back up right away.

WATCH MORE VIDEOS REGARDING JUDO MOVES AND THE HISTORY OF JUDO FROM USJA PRESIDENT GARY GOLTZ!

FOR MORE INFORMATION ON JUDO MOVES AND THE HISTORY OF JUDO:

For more information on the U.S. Judo Association (USJA) visit usja-judo.org.

Black Belt Magazine has a storied history that dates back all the way to 1961, making 2021 the 60th Anniversary of the world's leading magazine of martial arts. To celebrate six decades of legendary martial arts coverage, take a trip down memory lane by scrolling through some of the most influential covers ever published. From the creators of martial art styles, to karate tournament heroes, to superstars on the silver screen, and everything in between, the iconic covers of Black Belt Magazine act as a time capsule for so many important moments and figures in martial arts history. Keep reading to view the full list of these classic issues.

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Portugal's Jorge Fonseca showed an explosive brand of judo in claiming his second straight 100 kg gold medal at the World Judo Championships, Friday. Fonseca scored a half point on a throw in the finals against Serbia's Aleksandar Kukolj, then came back to score a full ippon a minute later with an inside trip. Kukolj entered the day needing to make it all the way to the finals to qualify for the Olympics. Though he had to settle for the silver medal here, he at least punched his ticket to the upcoming Tokyo Games.

In the women's half of the tournament, Germany's Anna-Maria Wagner needed to go to overtime to defeat defending champion Madeleine Malonga of France for the 78 kg title, scoring with an inside leg reap to claim the championship.


Within 24 hours of the cancellation of the 2021 U.S. Capitol Classics, the 2021 Compete International Martial Arts Championship has also been canceled. The world class tournament is promoted by Mohamad and Amanda Jahanvash in Ontario, California and was the last NASKA event to take place before the COVID-19 pandemic in February of 2020. The promoters released the following statement to announce the cancellation on Thursday:

We regret to announce that we will not be holding Compete this year. Due to Covid restrictions we had to make the decision that in order to provide the highest quality experience for our competitors, officials and families, we will not hold Compete World Martial Arts Championships in 2021. Compete will be February 25, 26 & 27, 2022 at Ontario Convention Center and we hope to see you there. Thank you all for your support.

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