To help you improve your grappling game, we asked George Kirby to share with us the top 10 jujitsu techniques from his book Jujitsu: Basic Techniques of the Gentle Art Expanded Edition. Here's what George Kirby had to say about the elbow lift:


"This is one of those 'dirt-simple' ketsugo techniques I learned from professor Harold Brosious. It works really well against someone who just grabs your sleeve or upper arm from behind and tries to walk you somewhere."

Jujitsu Technique No. 4: Elbow Lift

Japanese Translation: HIJI WAZA 1-2) Your attacker approaches from behind and grabs your right sleeve with his left hand. 3) Turn to your right toward your attacker, raising your right arm and turning it clockwise to your right. 4) By stepping toward him, your attacker's arm will bend slightly with your forearm up against the outside of his elbow. 5) Continue the circular movement (keeping your palm facing down), raising his elbow to get him off-balance. To set a come-along hold, clamp onto your left forearm with your right hand and raise your forearm just enough to keep your attacker up on his toes. (See inset 5A.) 6) The upward force of this move causes the attacker to fall backward. 7) Follow through even after the attacker has let go and fallen.

George Kirby's Top 10 Jujitsu Techniques

Technique No. 1: Shoulder-Lock Hip Throw Technique No. 2: Rear Leg-Lift Throw Technique No. 3: Basic Drop Throw Technique No. 4: Elbow Lift (Black Belt Hall of Fame member George Kirby has been teaching jujitsu for 40 years and is the co-founder of the American Ju-Jitsu Association. To learn more about these and other basic jujitsu techniques, check out Jujitsu: Basic Techniques of the Gentle Art Expanded Edition by George Kirby.)
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