For the last move in our jujitsu techniques series, check out the very first jujitsu weapons technique George Kirby learned. Here is what the jujitsu master had to say about it:


"Believe it or not, this was one of the first techniques I learned under Seki and it was for a knife thrust. There are lots of body movement and footwork skills that are learned in the process of executing this throw properly. Does it work? Ask one of my black-belt high-school girls who was attacked with a knife at a bus stop and broke the attacker’s wrist."

Jujitsu Technique No. 10: Basic Hand Throw

Japanese Translation: TE-NAGE 1.) Assume a ready position as you are threatened with a knife. 2.) Pivot your right foot back, thus moving your body out of the way of the straight knife thrust. (Note the arrow indicating the movement of the right foot.) After his knife hand has passed your left hand, reach for the wrist of his knife hand from behind. 3.) Your left hand grabs the attacker's right hand on top of his wrist—so he can't bend his hand— with your thumb between his third and fourth knuckle on the back of his hand. (See inset 3A.) Both thumbs may be put between his third and fourth knuckles, or you could strike his knife hand with your right kneecap to dislodge the knife. 4.) Step forward with your right foot as your right hand strikes the back of his hand with your thumb still in place. 5.) Pivot your left leg back (as indicated by the arrow) in a counterclockwise direction and push his bent hand with your right hand. 6-7.) Turn his hand in a counterclockwise direction while you continue to pivot your left foot back until you bring your opponent down. 8.) For a wrist-snap or elbow-snap submission, place your right instep tight against his right armpit with your foot on the ground and his elbow just below your kneecap. Keep his wrist bent down (and his arm straight) and turn it to the left as you turn to your left. Have your left leg away from the attacker for balance. 9.) If the attacker still has the knife, take it away from him before releasing him. For the submission (see inset 9A), place your left thumb next to your right thumb behind his hand. This hold also can be used for the throw.

George Kirby's Top 10 Jujitsu Techniques

Technique No. 1: Shoulder-Lock Hip Throw Technique No. 2: Rear Leg-Left Throw Technique No. 3: Basic Drop Throw Technique No. 4: Elbow Lift Technique No. 5: Shoulder-Lock Come-Along Technique No. 6: Shoulder-Lock Rear Takedown Technique No. 7: Sleeve Pivot Throw Technique No. 8: Outer Rear Sweeping Throw Technique No. 9: Armbar Rear Throw (George Kirby is the author of Jujitsu: Basic Techniques of the Gentle Art Expanded Edition. He is also the co-founder of the American Ju-Jitsu Association, an educational foundation, as well as a tactics consultant for the Los Angeles Police Department and organizer of the popular Camp Budoshin in California.)

Dr. Craig's Martial Arts Movie Lounge

When The Fast and the Furious (2001) sped into the psyche's of illegal street racing enthusiasts, with a penchant for danger and the psychotic insanity of arrant automotive adventure, the brusque bearish, quasi-hero rebel, Dominic "Dom" Toretto was caustic yet salvationally portrayed with the power of a train using a Vin Diesel engine.

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Host country Japan continued to run roughshod over judo at the Olympics Thursday winning both golds on day 6 of competition in Tokyo. Shori Hamada's match in the women's 78 kg division was over almost before it began as her French opponent, Madeleine Malonga, missed on an inside trip attempt just 10 seconds into the contest allowing the ground specialist, Hamada, to take it to the mat. Hamada worked her way free of Malonga's legs and into a hold down position for an easy pin to take the gold medal.

In the men's 100 kg category, Japan's Aaron Wolf waited until overtime against South Korea's Cho Gu-ham before going for his own ouchi gari, inside trip. Unlike Malonga though, Wolf, whose father is American and mother Japanese, landed his perfectly putting Cho flat on his back for an ippon, full point, to take the finals. Japan has now tied their own record for most gold medals (8) in a single Olympic judo competition with three events still to go.


There are hundreds, if not thousands of articles and advertisements, all touting the myriad of benefits children receive from studying martial arts. Let's assume the reader is already sold on the idea of having their child study martial arts, and now it's just a matter of finding the right school. As a former school owner myself, I thought I would share three things to consider when choosing a martial arts school for your child.
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