Black Belt asked jujitsu master George Kirby to tell us about a few of his favorite techniques from his new book, Jujitsu: Basic Techniques of the Gentle Art Expanded Edition. Long before Brazilian jiu-jitsu came to the United States, George Kirby wrote a book that would shape America’s understanding of jujitsu for decades to come. A 10th-degree black belt in jujitsu as well as an internationally recognized martial arts instructor and author, George Kirby is the co-founder of American Ju-jitsu Association (an educational foundation of and amateur athletic organization), a tactics consultant for the LAPD and organizer of the popular Camp Budoshin in California. The following technique is found in chapter 4 . Here is what George Kirby had to say about it:
"I like this technique because it is one of the fastest “judo” type throws out there. Once you get this throw [and its variation down, you’ll be amazed at how effectively you can use an attacker’s momentum to bring him down with very little effort."

Jujitsu Technique No. 3: Basic Drop Throw

Japanese Translation: TAI-OTOSHI
1) Assume a ready position as your attacker is about to strike.
2)Block his punch away to your left with your left forearm, then
3) slide your left hand down and to grab your attackers sleeve, stepping across with your left foot.
4) Pivot clockwise (to your left) on the ball of your left foot as your right hand grabs your attacker's clothing on his right shoulder.
5) Lift your right forearm to strike your attacker under the jaw as your right foot blocks his right leg below his knee, as close to his ankle as possible. Your right knee should be bent slightly against his right leg, with your right foot lined up right next to the outside of his right foot. Ideally, your right big toe should be tight next to his right foot little toe. This will guarantee that he is blocked low at his ankle. Before executing the throw, be sure you are balanced. This is initially done by looking directly forward and down. If you can see your left kneecap and the front of your left foot directly below it, you should be well-balanced for the throw. As you develop a feel for the throw, this will no longer be necessary.
6) Strengthen your right leg sharply as you pull with your left hand and push with your right, turning to your left (all at the same time). Be sure to keep your entire body in a straight line from your right foot to your shoulders.
7-8) Once your opponent is down, slide your left hand so that your fingers are underneath. Bring your right thumb and fingers next to your left hand to grab his wrist as you drop down on his biceps (optional move) with your left kneecap for submission. Dropping fast can break his wrist.

George Kirby's Top 10 Jujitsu Techniques

Technique No. 1: Shoulder-Lock Hip Throw Technique No. 2: Rear Leg-Lift Throw Technique No. 3: Basic Drop Throw Technique No. 4: Elbow Lift (To learn more about these and other basic jujitsu techniques, check out Jujitsu: Basic Techniques of the Gentle Art Expanded Edition by George Kirby.)

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