Do you love samurai movies? Have you always been fascinated with samurai weapons? Do you want to learn but don’t know where to even begin? In his new FREE Guide — Samurai Weapons: Sword Master James Williams Shows You How to Start Training With Japanese Samurai Swords — sword master James Williams shares his experience and expert advice based on decades of practice and study in the field of samurai weapons. “There’s something about a sword — when you pick one up, you’re picking up more than just a piece of steel,” says sword master James Williams. “You’re accepting the responsibility to learn how to use it and the responsibility to learn how to protect and defend other people. You’re taking up a task that’s been passed down for millennia.” Get your copy of this FREE Guide — Samurai Weapons: Sword Master James Williams Shows You How to Start Training With Japanese Samurai Swords — and learn how Japanese samurai swords can give life as well as take it away. Samurai Weapons Are Dangerous in the Wrong Hands
“If you just want to chop things, there’s all kinds of ways you do it. But swords are dangerous,” sword master James Williams explains. “A big mistake can be life changing. I absolutely think you should get training first.” In this FREE Guide — Samurai Weapons: Sword Master James Williams Shows You How to Start Training With Japanese Samurai Swords — sword master James Williams explains safety protocols for beginners to prevent injuries. Qualified Instruction Is Essential for Safe Use of Japanese Samurai Swords Get your copy of this FREE Guide — Samurai Weapons: Sword Master James Williams Shows You How to Start Training With Japanese Samurai Swords — and learn the safety measures when you’ve got a live blade in your hand. “Your first time with a live blade should not be when you’re home alone,” advises sword master James Williams. “It should be when you’re with your instructor. He’ll show you what to do, and you should do just that.” Japanese Samurai Swords Are Not Just Sharp Blades — They Are Part of a Lifestyle Sword master James Williams says that the study of samurai weapons is not an isolated activity but rather an endeavor that permeates the practitioner’s lifestyle. “Don’t look at it like you’re going to get a belt rank — because you’re not,” he says. “It’s a broad study in which you’re walking the path of warriors, not tiptoeing around the edge of the meadow. It’s a connection to the past. It teaches you things about life that you can’t easily learn elsewhere.” Japanese Swords as a Combat Weapon Get your copy of this FREE Guide — Samurai Weapons: Sword Master James Williams Shows You How to Start Training With Japanese Samurai Swords — and learn how the sword was perceived as a killing tool and a life-giving instrument. Proper Use of the Sword
"A long time ago in Japan, they talked about 'the killing sword' and 'the life-giving sword," explains sword master James Williams. "One aspect of that is, the only way you can protect — the only way the sword can give life — is if you can kill. If you’re not capable of cutting down evil, you can’t protect anybody. The only proper use of the sword is to cut down evil to protect and defend. You can do all the pretty movements, but if you haven’t learned how to use it as a killing tool ..." Find out more about the importance of using Japanese samurai swords for their designed intent in James Williams' new Free Guide — Samurai Weapons: Sword Master James Williams Shows You How to Start Training With Japanese Samurai Swords.

Dr. Craig's Martial Arts Movie Lounge

When The Fast and the Furious (2001) sped into the psyche's of illegal street racing enthusiasts, with a penchant for danger and the psychotic insanity of arrant automotive adventure, the brusque bearish, quasi-hero rebel, Dominic "Dom" Toretto was caustic yet salvationally portrayed with the power of a train using a Vin Diesel engine.

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Host country Japan continued to run roughshod over judo at the Olympics Thursday winning both golds on day 6 of competition in Tokyo. Shori Hamada's match in the women's 78 kg division was over almost before it began as her French opponent, Madeleine Malonga, missed on an inside trip attempt just 10 seconds into the contest allowing the ground specialist, Hamada, to take it to the mat. Hamada worked her way free of Malonga's legs and into a hold down position for an easy pin to take the gold medal.

In the men's 100 kg category, Japan's Aaron Wolf waited until overtime against South Korea's Cho Gu-ham before going for his own ouchi gari, inside trip. Unlike Malonga though, Wolf, whose father is American and mother Japanese, landed his perfectly putting Cho flat on his back for an ippon, full point, to take the finals. Japan has now tied their own record for most gold medals (8) in a single Olympic judo competition with three events still to go.


There are hundreds, if not thousands of articles and advertisements, all touting the myriad of benefits children receive from studying martial arts. Let's assume the reader is already sold on the idea of having their child study martial arts, and now it's just a matter of finding the right school. As a former school owner myself, I thought I would share three things to consider when choosing a martial arts school for your child.
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