Techniques

Bruce Lee practiced strength training faithfully, just like martial arts. However, he was very secretive about his training. The programing Bruce created for himself was specifically designed to keep him lean and fast. He experimented with power, endurance, coordination, agility, flexibility, nutrition, and even the amount of time he could rest before training again. Speed and power were Bruce's essential outcomes, so he focused on training that would produce minimal hypertrophy. Bruce had specific training regimens that he researched extensively through practical application.

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Visualize, the fight begins. You go into your defensive stance. You spend about 30 seconds moving around looking for an entry point or angle to punch, kick, or lock up and take down your opponent. You find the point and throw an explosive punch. Your opponent blocks it. You go back into your defensive stance and wait to find another opportunity. Or, let's say in jiu-jitsu, you spend 2 minutes in the mount or guard position waiting to find the opportunity to execute the right technique with speed and explosiveness.

Punch faster, kick quicker, throw harder. Yes, these are all important to develop in your martial arts. However, martial arts and jiu-jitsu are not predominantly explosive sports. They are sports that use explosive techniques that have bursts of speed from their aerobic base. And, if your aerobic base has no strength, no foundation, then it affects your endurance, explosiveness, and speed. After you perform an explosive fast technique like a kick or throw without success, where do you have to return, to your aerobic base.

Let's understand the three different energy systems so you can comprehend their integration into martial arts.

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A new study in the Annals of Internal Medicine found that tai chi seemed as effective as conventional exercise in reducing the waist size of middle age and older adults who suffered from central obesity. The study, conducted by researchers at the University of Hong Kong, the Chinese University of Hong Kong, the Chinese Academy of Sciences, and UCLA, examined more than 500 test subjects 50 years old and above.

The researchers randomly assigned volunteers to one of three groups: a non-exercise group, a group that did aerobic and strength exercises, and a group that practiced Yang style tai chi. Participants in the latter two groups exercised or practiced tai chi for one hour three days a week and were measured after 12 weeks and again after 38 weeks. The group practicing tai chi saw about the same reduction in their waist lines as the group doing standard exercises.


Every Sport karate competitor knows how hard it is to get through one routine, let alone several of them. Each routine is only about a minute and a half, but this minute and a half is composed of nonstop hard- hitting movements that take a lot of energy from the body. The more events a competitor competes in, the more in tune they need to be with their body and training. I typically compete in six events (some of which all are ran the same night, within the span of just over an hour). After those six divisions are completed, if I were to win any of the events, there are other rounds; "overall grands", which means I would compete again the following day. There is a very specific type of training that needs to be done in order to obtain success inside the ring.

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