Drills

Improve your MMA kicking with body conditioning through exercises such as the airborne lunge, demonstrated by John Wolf as instructed by Scott Sonnon in this NEW excerpt from his Ultimate Conditioning DVD series.

In addition to serving as the U.S. National Sambo Team coach and a top-level referee, Scott Sonnon is a multi-sport national and international champion. As the first American to study behind the Iron Curtain with the USSR's national and Olympic coaches, he earned the Honourable Master of Sport diploma. In the 1990s, Scott Sonnon was appointed chairman for establishing the rule structure forsambo'smixed-martial arts competition. Scott Sonnon has trained Alberto Crane, Elvis Sinosic, Jorge Rivera and Egan Inoue. Scott Sonnon has also worked as a training adviser for the National Law Enforcement and Security Institute, the U.S. Army Combatives School, Italian counterterrorism units, Australian law-enforcement personnel, Russian and Israeli special forces, the Norwegian military security forces, and the Office of Air and Marine. In hisUltimate ConditioningDVD series, Scott Sonnon takes viewers through a series of progressively difficult workouts using plyometric boxes, sandbags, kettlebells, medicine balls, body weight and Sonnon's proprietary Clubbell® to improve strength, endurance and overall skills. In this excerpt fromUltimate Conditioning — Volume 3: Kickers, Scott Sonnon takes colleague John Wolf through an exercise called the airborne lunge.

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Street attacks are typically quick, brutal events intended to overwhelm the victim. Learn how "Combatives for Street Survival" author Kelly McCann stays conditioned for quick, explosive and equally brutal counterattacks in this exclusive article!

"Good to go" is a common military colloquialism indicating readiness. Are you physically good to go for an unexpected, violent street confrontation? What's considered adequately fit in regard to defending yourself? How can it be quantified? On the no-to-low end of the spectrum, some believe fitness is irrelevant because self-defense techniques are supposed to incapacitate an attacker so quickly … "supposed to," hmm. That's a pretty naive perspective. The results of any self-defense technique are always conditional on the street because of myriad variables that are out of your control. You can't depend on technique, power and luck always aligning perfectly to achieve a desired outcome; "guaranteed to succeed" is a dangerous appraisal of any technique, tactic or weapon. Middle-grounders believe fitness is a requirement of self-defense and achieve their personal concept of it in different ways — from running to weightlifting to cross-training. Although well-intentioned and generally fit, some in this group may find that their conditioning program failed to adequately prepare them for the demanding and specific physical requirements of a snot-slinging fight for their life.

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