The staff of Black Belt was told that on April 2, 2012, first-generation Bruce Lee student Howard Williams passed away. The cause of death is being reported as a heart attack. Williams took up jeet kune do when he was 15 or 16. He studied under Bruce Lee and James Lee in Oakland, California, for five years. Williams kept a low profile in the ensuing years until Dr. Jerry Beasley, having noticed increasing interest in “original JKD,” organized the a jeet kune do training camp in Radford, Virginia, in 1993. Beasley formulated the curriculum around the offerings of two first-gen practitioners: Williams and Ted Wong. I was fortunate to meet and talk extensively with both men.


JEET KUNE DO CREATOR BRUCE LEE HIMSELF WAS A STUDENT ... OF BOXING!
Bruce Lee was more of a boxer at heart than most people know. Find out how the boxing techniques of Muhammad Ali and Joe Louis influenced his development of jeet kune do techniques in this FREE Guide — Bruce Lee Training Research: How Boxing Influenced His Jeet Kune Do Techniques.

Williams was soft-spoken and smile-prone, but under that gentle exterior lay a man capable of explosive movement and phenomenal hand speed. In each class, he’d demo the particular technique he wanted the students to work on—often a punch or a trap—then answer questions on technical topics. He’d really beam, however, when a question about Bruce was posed. “Howard could have been a popular JKD instructor — a lot of people said he was one of the best — but he preferred to stay out of the spotlight,” Beasley said. “He was very likable, and people remembered him fondly. It’s very sad to hear of his passing.”
SUBSCRIBE TO BLACKBELT MAGAZINE TODAY!
Don't miss a single issue of the world largest magazine of martial arts.

Just like royalty has dynastic families that rule over nations, martial arts have dynasties that rule over the world of combat. So here's a list of our top five family dynasties in martial arts...


Keep Reading Show less

In Virtual Fight Tour's third promotion, several exciting point fighting matches highlighted another successful event.

The first two Virtual Fight Tour events were streamed from New York and Georgia, but this card went down in Texas with a roster full of fighters from the Lone Star State. Despite several injuries, every fight was well-contested and gave sport karate fans the show they signed up for. Keep reading for results and analysis of every bout.

Keep Reading Show less

The media website "Ekyooto Uganda" is reporting that a boy training as part of a karate group being sent out to support the country's ruling party in upcoming elections has died after being crushed by bricks placed atop his body. The group was giving a demonstration at a primary school in the Ugandan capital of Kampala when the unidentified team member was supposedly overwhelmed from the weight of bricks piled on his stomach by the group's leader, Charles Lwanga.

The National Resistance Movement, which has ruled Uganda since 1986, said the karate group is not meant to cause violence or intimidate voters but is there to protect party members from attack and safeguard votes in the general elections that are scheduled for February.

Renowned sport karate competitor and Glory Kickboxing 2019 Knockout of the Year winner Ross Levine breaks down a variety of kickboxing drills and skills in this live seminar.

Keep Reading Show less
Free Bruce Lee Guide
Have you ever wondered how Bruce Lee’s boxing influenced his jeet kune do techniques? Read all about it in this free guide.
Don’t miss a thing Subscribe to Our Newsletter