The staff of Black Belt was told that on April 2, 2012, first-generation Bruce Lee student Howard Williams passed away. The cause of death is being reported as a heart attack. Williams took up jeet kune do when he was 15 or 16. He studied under Bruce Lee and James Lee in Oakland, California, for five years. Williams kept a low profile in the ensuing years until Dr. Jerry Beasley, having noticed increasing interest in “original JKD,” organized the a jeet kune do training camp in Radford, Virginia, in 1993. Beasley formulated the curriculum around the offerings of two first-gen practitioners: Williams and Ted Wong. I was fortunate to meet and talk extensively with both men.


JEET KUNE DO CREATOR BRUCE LEE HIMSELF WAS A STUDENT ... OF BOXING!
Bruce Lee was more of a boxer at heart than most people know. Find out how the boxing techniques of Muhammad Ali and Joe Louis influenced his development of jeet kune do techniques in this FREE Guide — Bruce Lee Training Research: How Boxing Influenced His Jeet Kune Do Techniques.

Williams was soft-spoken and smile-prone, but under that gentle exterior lay a man capable of explosive movement and phenomenal hand speed. In each class, he’d demo the particular technique he wanted the students to work on—often a punch or a trap—then answer questions on technical topics. He’d really beam, however, when a question about Bruce was posed. “Howard could have been a popular JKD instructor — a lot of people said he was one of the best — but he preferred to stay out of the spotlight,” Beasley said. “He was very likable, and people remembered him fondly. It’s very sad to hear of his passing.”

How will you perform at the moment of truth?

What's going to happen to you physically and emotionally in a real fight where you could be injured or killed? Will you defend yourself immediately, hesitate during the first few critical seconds of the fight, or will you be so paralyzed with fear that you won't be able to move at all? The answer is - you won't know until you can say, "Been there, done that." However, there is a way to train for that fearful day.

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This week I've asked Robert Borisch to give me a birds eye view on his marketing strategy.

Robert is the head sensei and owner of Tri-City Judo a well-established commercial judo school in Kennewick, Washington. I am very impressed with his highly successful business. Unlike BJJ, TKD, karate, and krav maga, in judo we tend to teach in community centers, YMCA's, and other not for profit outlets. So when I find a for profit judo model that is growing by leaps and bounds, it intrigues me. Below are Robert's raw and uncensored comments spoken like a true commercial martial arts school entrepreneur / owner.

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The man who apparently launched a racist verbal attack on U.S. women's kata champion Sakura Kokumai earlier this month in a California park has been arrested following a physical assault on an elderly Korean-American couple in the same park Sunday. Michael Vivona is accused of punching a 79-year-old man and his 80-year-old wife without provocation.

Mynewsla.com reported that a group of people playing basketball in Grijalva Park at the time of the assault recognized Vivona from his previous harassment of Kokumai and surrounded him until a nearby police officer arrived to make an arrest. The incident with Kokumai, who is slated to represent the United States in this summer's Tokyo Olympics, gained widespread notice after she posted a video of it on social media in an effort to increase awareness about the growing threat of anti-Asian racism.