Tae Kwon Do Kick

To be fast in martial arts, one must improve their reflexes. To punch faster, block a punch, to kick quickly, all require reflexive coordination and training. By developing your reflexes, you can take your performance to a higher level.


What is a Reflex

A reflex is an involuntary instant movement reaction based on a response of a situation or stimulus. For example, when you touch a hot pan on the stove accidentally or not thinking it is hot, you will automatically jerk your hand away without thinking about it. Or, similar to someone going to punch you in the stomach and you flinch and contract your ribcage and abs. There is no delay when the reflex happens. Reflexes are actions that do not require thinking, they just occur.

The Cross Extensor Reflex

The cross-extensor reflex is a withdrawal reflex. An example of this is when a person steps on a tack or a nail and withdrawals their foot from the floor instantly due to pain. As the foot is withdrawal quickly and instantly from the floor, it sends a reflex signal to the opposite leg to stiffen into extension quickly so you don't fall. The stiffness enhances the stability of the standing leg. When the foot is jerked up from the floor, the reflex is automatically activated due to pain. The great thing about this reflex is, it is trainable.

Try this as an experiment to understand the cross-extensor reflex. Standing in place, lift one knee up as fast as you can. You should feel the standing leg stiffen. The higher and faster you lift your knee, activates the stiffness of the standing leg.

Now, put your foot down to the floor, straightening your leg as quickly as you can. You should feel the other knee lift up to your hip quickly. As the leg goes from flexion to extension, it causes the opposite foot and knee to lift from the floor fast and instantly.

These two examples have to be done with speed.

The Stumble Reflex

The stumble reflex is a reflex that when you fall forward your foot automatically and quickly steps or kicks out in front of you. For example, when you are walking and your toes catch the lip of the uneven pavement and you trip. Automatically, the opposite leg will sling forward reflexively with speed to stop your fall. Also, your hands automatically lift up and out in front of you to balance and stabilize you from falling as well as to break your fall to protect you from knocking your head on the ground. This reflex is also trainable.

Click here for a video that will show you how the cross-extensor and stumble reflex work.

Reflexive Strength Training

Reflexive strength training is essential if you want to improve agility and speed. It develops and coordinates the reflexes ability to respond to movement with speed and precision. When training the reflexes, you can use heavy, light and no weights.

What's important first is to use light or no weights; to first coordinate the reflexes. Once the reflexes are conditioned and coordinated, you can add resistance and do something called contrast training. Contrast training is using the same exercise two times as one set. For example, the first is a loaded exercise using a heavy weight for about 5 reps. Then after the 5 reps, rest for 10-seconds and do the same movement using body weight only.

For instance, doing the first exercise in the video using the cross-extensor and stumble reflex with weight and then doing the same exercise without it. The first exercise will enhance the neural potentiation for reflexive speed in the second. This will only happen once you have coordination of the reflex.

The video below will show you how to train the cross extensor and stumble reflex.

How to Boost Your Agility, Speed and Reflexes

A trained core is essential for MMA and all forms of martial arts and grappling. Bruce Lee's abdominal training is the best of both worlds. It produces a powerful explosive core and will chisel out your abs. Bruce always sought out the best exercises for strength and speed to make himself better. Over the years of training, Lee understood that all movement is generated from the center, the hips and the core. Your abdominals are the source of power to kick, punch, jump, and run. The spine also uses the core for stability.
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