Turkey Karate 2021
World Karate Federation (Instagram)

The European Karate Championships concluded in Poreč, Croatia Sunday with Turkey dominating on both the men's and women's sides. The Turks led the standings with six golds and nine overall medals. Germany was a distant second with two golds and five total medals. But despite taking two of the five men's kumite categories behind 84 kg winner Uğur Aktaş and 60 kg champion Eray Şamdan, Turkey couldn't medal in the men's team kumite competition, which was won by host country Croatia.

Similarly, though Serap Özçelik won gold in the women's 50 kg division and Meltem Hocaoğlu took the women's over 68 kg category for Turkey, the Turks could only manage second in women's team kumite as Germany came out on top while Italy secured the women's team kata event. Turkey, meanwhile, managed to snag the men's team kata competition behind individual winner Ali Sofuoğlu.

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