In three exclusive videos, the Brazilian jiu-jitsu legend and 2011 Black Belt Hall of Fame Instructor of the Year shows you six sets of moves that can make the difference between winning and losing on the mat!

In three exclusive videos of filmed at Black Belt, Jean Jacques Machado shows you six BJJ moves: two submissions, two escapes and two finishes. While these videos were filmed during a photo shoot for Black Belt magazine, these techniques and many more are featured in his acclaimed 3-DVD instructional set, The Grappler's Handbook: Gi and No-Gi Techniques.


BRAZILIAN JIU-JITSU VIDEO Learn Two Submissions From Closed Guard!

Who Is This Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu Master? Jean Jacques Machado is a former national and international grappling tournament competitor. His legendary skills in Brazilian jiu-jitsu recently garnered him a coveted red-and-black-striped belt from international icon Rickson Gracie. In 2011, Machado was inducted into the Black Belt Hall of Fame as its Instructor of the Year.

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4 Submission Escapes From Jean Jacques Machado: Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu Tactics for Escaping and Reversing

How This Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu Master Teaches BJJ Moves Worldwide Through the Jean Jacques Machado Academies in Tarzana, CA, and Malibu, CA, seminars where he teaches BJJ moves to eager students and an extensive informational website, Machado is at the forefront of spreading Brazilian jiu-jitsu on a worldwide scale. He is also the author of the two best-selling books — The Grappler’s Handbook Vol. 1: Gi and No-Gi Techniques and The Grappler’s Handbook Vol. 2: Tactics for Defense, as well as a 3-DVD set based on the first book. BJJ Moves in Side Control As explained in the video below, it is important to get our from under the opponent when he’s got you in side control. “Common position here, I’m defending,” Machado says, setting up BJJ moves for getting his knee out from under his opponent (in this case, Grappler’s Handbook co-author Jay Zeballos) and maneuvers into a scene where it would be “natural [for him] to push my leg and pass my guard.” There’s a catch (or, in this case, a hook) as Zeballos attempts to pass Machado’s guard. Machado pushes his opponent’s left leg out from under him and hooks his arm, effectively destabilizing his center of gravity. During these elegantly composed BJJ moves, Machado’s entire body axis changes so that Zeballos is beautifully flipped onto his back. Machado then circles around to establish his own side control, thus turning the tables in his favor.

BRAZILIAN JIU-JITSU VIDEO Learn Two Escapes From Side Control!

For the second of his techniques from side control, Machado explains how “you can also go for what we call a ‘crucifix.’” With Zeballos in side control once again, Machado proceeds to get his right knee up and to push Zeballos away with his left knee. This time, though, Machado inserts his right leg under Zeballos’ left arm and hooks under it while pulling himself under Zeballos to catch that same left arm with both legs as he brings them around to roll Zeballos onto his back. Machado hooks Zeballos’ right arm with his own, and Zeballos lands perpendicular on top of Machado with arms extended, forming an image reminiscent of a crucifix! Machado then gets his left arm under Zeballos’ chin to press the choke and finish the submission. BJJ Moves: Two Finishes From the Mount These two sets of BJJ moves were featured in the November 2011 issue of Black Belt magazine as a "Plan A / Backup Plan" scenario — depending, of course, on your opponent's reaction when you're in the mount.

BRAZILIAN JIU-JITSU VIDEO Learn Two Finishes From Side Mount!

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