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Eskrima/Kali Essentials: the Filipino Martial Art of Stick, Hands and Blades

Eskrima/Kali Essentials: the Filipino Martial Art of Stick, Hands and Blades
Eskrima/Kalialso known as Arnis or FMA (Filipino Martial Arts), is a martial art style that originated from the Philippines. It is a weapon-based martial art that focuses on the use of sticks, knives, and other bladed weapons, as well as empty hand techniques.

History and Origins:

Eskrima/Kali has its roots in the Philippines, where it was developed and practiced by the

indigenous tribes for self-defense against invading colonizers. The art was passed down from generation to generation through oral tradition and practical application. The word "Eskrima" comes from the Spanish word "esgrima," which means "fencing." Kali, on the other hand, is a term that originated in the Visayan region of the Philippines, which refers to the ancient pre-Hispanic art of blade fighting.

Principles and Techniques:

Eskrima focuses on practical self-defense techniques that can be used in real-life situations. The principles of Eskrima include speed, accuracy, coordination, and timing. The techniques are based on the use of weapons such as sticks, knives, and machetes. Eskrima also incorporates empty-hand techniques such as strikes, kicks, and throws.

The training in Eskrima usually begins with the use of a stick or rattan, which is a flexible and durable material that is commonly used in the Philippines. The techniques involve striking, blocking, and trapping with the stick. Eskrima/Kali also emphasizes the use of both hands equally, as well as the use of footwork to move in and out of range.

As the practitioner advances, the use of knives and other bladed weapons are introduced.

The techniques for knife fighting are similar to the stick techniques, but they require more precision and accuracy due to the lethal nature of the weapon. Eskrima also includes techniques for disarming an opponent, as well as defending against multiple attackers.

Benefits:

Eskrima/Kali is not only a practical self-defense system but also a great form of exercise.

The training involves a lot of movement, which helps improve cardiovascular health and stamina. It also helps develop coordination, balance, and agility. Eskrima is also a great stress reliever as it requires mental focus and concentration, allowing practitioners to forget about their worries and focus on their training.

Training and Equipment:

Eskrima can be practiced with a partner or alone. The training usually begins with basic drills and techniques, and then progresses to more advanced techniques and sparring. The equipment needed for Eskrima includes a pair of rattan sticks, a training knife, and protective gear such as gloves, headgear, and a mouthguard.

Finally:

Eskrima is a weapon-based martial art that originated from the Philippines. It focuses on practical self-defense techniques that can be used in real-life situations.

The principles of Eskrima include speed, accuracy, coordination, and timing. The techniques involve the use of sticks, knives, and other bladed weapons, as well as empty hand techniques. Eskrima is a great form of exercise that improves cardiovascular health, coordination, balance, and agility. The training can be done with a partner or alone, and the equipment needed includes a pair of rattan sticks, a training knife, and protective gear.

You can start learning Eskrima/Kali from masters like Thomas Sipin here!

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