Self-defense often doesn't look like it is, by necessity of the medium, presented in martial arts magazines ... but that doesn't make it any less effective, according to self-defense expert Rob Pincus in this exclusive video.

You're out for a walk in the city at night and a man approaches you. Before you know it, he comes at you for a knife attack. What do you do? In a martial arts magazine, self-defense expertsc ould suggest a variety of counterattacks — some from the traditional martial arts arena, some from the modern martial arts such as krav maga ,and others from the reality-based self-defense world of combatives and the like. The common element, though, would be a picture-perfect execution. "Assailants" attack when the self-defense instructor tells them to, the photographer directs the angle, and there would probably be the opportunity for a second take — not to mention the in-studio snacks and option for lunch when the shoot wraps. But what does a not-so-picture-perfect knife-attack scenario look like? Combat Focus Shooting expert Rob Pincus talks about that in his latest video, shot exclusively for BlackBeltMag.com:


CLOSE-QUARTERS COMBAT VIDEO Rob Pincus Discusses Self-Defense Against a Knife Attack Under Pressure in a Dynamic Situation

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Armed with a training gun, Rob Pincus reacts to the approach of his assailant calmly in an attempt to diffuse the potentially lethal situation. As the attack situation escalates, so does the volume of Rob Pincus' voice as he urges the assailant to "Stop!" and "Stay back!" as they clash in a flurry of advances, retreats, twists and turns. Rob Pincus deflects the attacker's knife arm outward so as to keep it extended and away from his own torso's vital organs. This hyperextension throws the attacker slightly off-balance.

While he attempts to regain ground so as to get his knife hand back into the game, Rob Pincus sneaks his right arm under the opponent's left shoulder and forces that left arm up and over to (a) keep the attacker's left hand away from the firearm stowed on his belt and (b) open up the attacker's own vital-organ section and get him into position for the most effective usage of said firearm.

It's a loud, messy scene. The combatants are all over the place. There is no "take two." These guys are playing for keeps, and it's not very photo-friendly. "You can see that in a dynamic environment," Rob Pincus explains, "it's much harder to actually make all that look perfect."

Rob Pincus continues: "And as we know, with any complex motor skills, when you do them at speed and under pressure, they're going to look sloppy. ... The key was keeping [the attacker's right] arm, using an outside-90, using a forearm technique — kind of a SPEAR System technique — to keep that knife away from my body until I can get pressure and control and then slip my underhook in to a point where I can get set up to duck in."

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