Matt Culley

As the world continues to "shrink" and feel smaller through technological innovations in communication and travel, our world also seems to be more divided than ever before. Our culture now teaches us to be "followers" and "subscribers" to content, that in turn guides many people's thoughts, and affects how they interact with the world around them on daily basis. Ultimately, in a time of such uncertainty and division, our focus and efforts should be placed directly on building and developing leaders, not followers. In order to do this in a modern world, and cut through all the chatter and digital content, we must look back to a time tested, traditional approach to building leaders.


Martial Arts has traveled throughout the world, and its teachings have been passed down throughout the generations. Through countless adaptations and innovations, each art form continues to evolve into the future as techniques are modified and improved. All this progress is done while also trying to maintain a spiritual connection to the past. As a teacher passes down the knowledge they've learned to their students, the addition of a "new mind" to the lineage of instruction inherently gives birth to a multitude of new possibilities. Not just within the specific art, but it also multiplies the vast possibilities beyond just the physical techniques.

Matt Culley

Martial Arts has the ability to touch many lives, in a variety of ways. Once someone is truly touched by the lifesaving gift of Martial Arts, one is forever inducted into a worldwide family of Martial Artists. Each one possessing different physical, mental, and spiritual characteristics that can impact the world in different ways. One student could revolutionize the way Martial Arts reaches the world, while another could create the foundation for a new art form to emerge, and another could change the way we approach childhood obesity, all through the power of Martial Arts.

Wether you come from a traditional Martial Arts background, or if you created your personal foundation through MMA and the modern Martial Arts world, the power to provoke positive change is within you as a Martial Artist. True leadership is the ability to overcome one's own fears to better yourself, and in turn, help to better those around you. To sacrifice, and "put in the work" for self improvement, to ensure, enable, and guide others on the same journey. Martial Arts is a tool with many uses, but it is also one that must continually be sharpened to be fully effective. By adding Martial Arts study to a school curriculum or mandating it at a corporate level, we would give our culture access to all the potential we hold within ourselves and the confidence to share it with the world.

As we continue to move forward into an unknown future, we must not forget how to build our future leaders by honoring the spirit of our past. To do this, we need more Martial Arts.

Dr. Craig's Martial Arts Movie Lounge

When The Fast and the Furious (2001) sped into the psyche's of illegal street racing enthusiasts, with a penchant for danger and the psychotic insanity of arrant automotive adventure, the brusque bearish, quasi-hero rebel, Dominic "Dom" Toretto was caustic yet salvationally portrayed with the power of a train using a Vin Diesel engine.

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The skill of stick fighting as a handy weapon dates from the prehistory of mankind. The stick has got an advantage over the stone because it could be used both for striking and throwing. In lots of countries worlwide when dealing with martial arts there is a special place for fighters skillful in stick fighting. ( India, China, Japan, Korea, New Zealand, countries of Africa, Europe and Americas etc).

The short stick as a handy weapon has been used as a means of self-defence from animals and later various attackers. Regarding its length it was better than the long stick, primarily because it was easier to carry and use. The short stick as a means of self-defence was used namely in all countries of the world long time ago.

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The Czech Republic's Lukas Krpalek put himself in the history books Friday when he became only the third judoka to ever win Olympic gold medals in two different weight categories claiming the men's +100 kg division in Tokyo. Krpalek, who won the under 100 kg class at the 2016 Rio Olympics, hit a throw with time running out in the finals against Georgia's Guram Tushishvili and went into a hold down to pin Tushishvili for the full point to earn his second Olympic championship. Meanwhile, two-time defending +100 kg champion Teddy Riner of France, considered by some the greatest judoka in history, was upset in the quarter finals and had to settle for the bronze.

On the women's side, Akira Sone helped Japan break its own record for most judo gold medals in a single Olympics when she claimed her country's ninth gold of the tournament capturing the women's +78 kg division against Cuba's Idalys Ortiz. The win came in somewhat anticlimactic fashion as no throws were landed and Ortiz lost on penalties in overtime.