Don't let his friendly Southern accent fool you. Lamar M. Davis II is a tank of a man with formidable fighting skills. In this exclusive video from a Black Belt magazine photo shoot, Davis brings "economy of motion" to life.

Second-generation Bruce Lee student Lamar M. Davis II studied under five of Bruce Lee's original students (Joseph Cowles, Patrick Strong, Leo Fong, Jerry Poteet and Steve Golden). Through this jeet kune do technique video demonstrating Lee's one-inch punch, Lamar M. Davis II brings the concept of economy of motion through efficiency, directness and simplicity to life.


JEET KUNE DO TECHNIQUE VIDEO Lamar M. Davis II Demonstrates Bruce Lee's One-Inch Punch!

The stuff of legend in films such as Kill Bill: Vol. 2, Jet Li's Fearless and the feature-film re-imagining of The Green Hornet, the one-inch punch is actually a punching exercise that translates into a close-quarters strike of significant explosive power. Made popular by Bruce Lee, of course, at demonstrations such as the 1964 Long Beach International Karate Championships, the one-inch punch also has been notably used by martial artists such as Michael D. Echanis. "You hear some people refer to the one-inch punch as this, but this is actually a three-inch punch," Lamar M. Davis II explains, gesturing with an open palm and fingers pointing toward his opponent's central chest. "The one-inch punch actually comes from the first knuckle." Positioning himself in front of his demonstration partner's chest-held focus mitt, Lamar M. Davis II continues: "I just explode from here into the glove. And there's not going to be any pulling back." The demonstration speaks for itself, as the impact of Lamar M. Davis II's one-inch punch knocks his partner significantly off-balance, sending him backward several steps — all without a windup preceding the explosive strike.

Joe Lewis recalls his glory days training with Bruce Lee and
competing on the circuit in this FREE download!
Joe Lewis: How the Bruce Lee Training Method
Made Him — and Can Make YOU — a Better Fighter

A martial arts practitioner for more than 40 years, Lamar M. Davis II has devoted more than 30 of those years exclusively to training inBruce Lee’s art of jeet kune do. Davis is certified as a full/senior instructor by five of Bruce Lee’s original students. Jeet kune do expert Lamar M. Davis II is the founder and head instructor of Hardcore Jeet Kune Do. He serves as the executive director/senior instructor of the Hardcore Jeet Kune Do Chinese Gung Fu Association. Lamar M. Davis II is also the co-founder of the International Wing Chun/Jeet Kune Do Alliance and the Efficient Warrior Alliance. For more topics from Bruce Lee's jeet kune do, such as ...
  • attacks
  • defenses
  • energy training
  • timing
  • mobility
... be sure to pick up a copy of Lamar M. Davis II's three-volume jeet kune do DVD set, Jeet Kune Do for the Advanced Practitioner, available in our online store!

Dr. Craig's Martial Arts Movie Lounge

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The skill of stick fighting as a handy weapon dates from the prehistory of mankind. The stick has got an advantage over the stone because it could be used both for striking and throwing. In lots of countries worlwide when dealing with martial arts there is a special place for fighters skillful in stick fighting. ( India, China, Japan, Korea, New Zealand, countries of Africa, Europe and Americas etc).

The short stick as a handy weapon has been used as a means of self-defence from animals and later various attackers. Regarding its length it was better than the long stick, primarily because it was easier to carry and use. The short stick as a means of self-defence was used namely in all countries of the world long time ago.

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The Czech Republic's Lukas Krpalek put himself in the history books Friday when he became only the third judoka to ever win Olympic gold medals in two different weight categories claiming the men's +100 kg division in Tokyo. Krpalek, who won the under 100 kg class at the 2016 Rio Olympics, hit a throw with time running out in the finals against Georgia's Guram Tushishvili and went into a hold down to pin Tushishvili for the full point to earn his second Olympic championship. Meanwhile, two-time defending +100 kg champion Teddy Riner of France, considered by some the greatest judoka in history, was upset in the quarter finals and had to settle for the bronze.

On the women's side, Akira Sone helped Japan break its own record for most judo gold medals in a single Olympics when she claimed her country's ninth gold of the tournament capturing the women's +78 kg division against Cuba's Idalys Ortiz. The win came in somewhat anticlimactic fashion as no throws were landed and Ortiz lost on penalties in overtime.