Bruce Lee Training Philosophy and Little-Known Bruce Lee Facts

The July 2012 issue of Black Belt will be a special collector's issue devoted entirely to the life and legend of jeet kune do founder and martial arts icon Bruce Lee. This special issue will feature a guest editorial by his daughter, Shannon Lee, as well as articles detailing Bruce Lee facts, Bruce Lee's training methods, opinions and recollections regarding Bruce Lee's philosophy, commentaries on Bruce Lee's fighting style. Interviewees for this special issue include no less than the one-and-only Chuck Norris as well as Enter the Dragon producer Fred Weintraub. Highlights of this special collector's issue include the following:


Bruce Lee Facts

  • The truth behind Bruce Lee's Chinese name
  • Bruce Lee's first appearance on the cover of Black Belt
  • How critical opinion of Bruce Lee movies has changed over time
  • How Jason Scott Lee was trained to play Bruce Lee in Dragon: The Bruce Lee Story
  • How Bruce Lee's status in Asia is still going strong
  • Dr. Craig D. Reid on the most important Bruce Lee movies

Bruce Lee Training Methods

  • Mark Hatmaker's opinion on Bruce Lee's training method involving boxing and wrestling
  • Dasha Libin Anderson, M.S., CSCS, on the use of protein shakes in Bruce Lee's training
  • Robert Wang, M.D., on the scientific approach of Bruce Lee's training methodology

Bruce Lee Philosophy

  • Keith Vargo on the influence of Bruce Lee's philosophy in and beyond the martial arts
  • Dr. Craig D. Reid on how the Bruce Lee philosophy of living life inspired him and countless others

Shannon Lee Editorial

Shannon Lee discusses plans and progress for the Bruce Lee Action Museum: "Our dreams began to take a new form in 2008 when the idea of building a Bruce Lee museum first took hold. And although we announced our plans to establish a home for the legacy of my father then, it wasn't until 2011 that we began to take the steps in earnest to make this a reality."

Bruce Lee Fighting Style

  • Mark Jacobs on how Bruce Lee's fighting style incorporated fencing
  • Jason Brick on how Bruce Lee's fighting style of mixing useful elements may have given rise to what we now know as MMA
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Bruce Lee Enter the Dragon
d2e111jq13me73.cloudfront.net / Enter the Dragon/ Warner Bros.
Bruce Lee really did have the Midas touch when it came to training. Most people think Bruce was advanced and complicated, but he was the master of simplicity. He was not worried about doing the jump-up flip spin-around back kick. Not sure if there is one. But by the time you land, Bruce would just throw a simple kick or punch to knock you down as you landed to the ground. However, that is the point. Simplicity is often overlooked because of the coolness and the latest and greatest workout when simplicity produces the most significant effect. Super complicated does not mean superior. This is actually reverse in fact. We see super complex exercises that don’t need to be. Truthfully, if an exercise or method is not straightforward in its approach, then it probably is not good.
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