Bruce Lee: Martial Arts Megastar's New Book by JKD Historian Details the Icon's Personal, Physical and Philosophical Evolution

In an exclusive video interview filmed at Black Belt, "Bruce Lee: The Evolution of a Martial Artist" author Tommy Gong discusses how the jeet kune do founder became and remains one of the world's most influential martial artists.

In his new book Bruce Lee: The Evolution of a Martial Artist, author Tommy Gong chronicles the path of the Enter the Dragon star and jeet kune do founder's progression in martial arts techniques and training methods, painting a portrait of a man seeking — and eventually finding — a philosophy of self-actualization. His efforts were aided by unprecedented access to the archives at Bruce Lee Enterprises, from which he pulled rare and unique photos, letters and personal writings. He also had access to Lee's childhood classmates, former students and family friends. The result is a new book that provides what Linda Lee Cadwell, Bruce Lee's widow, calls, "the story of a remarkable man ... [that] lays out a blueprint that will inspire the reader to create his or her own path to success." In this exclusive video filmed at Black Belt, Gong talks about Bruce Lee's path to success, detailing what he calls a "perfect storm" of circumstance, family history and personal ambition for Lee to go from "Bruce Lee: martial arts instructor and TV actor" to "Bruce Lee: martial arts icon and movie star."


BRUCE LEE: MARTIAL ARTS HISTORY VIDEO Tommy Gong, JKD Historian and Author of New Book Bruce Lee: The Evolution of a Martial Artist, Talks About the Icon's Personal, Physical and Philosophical Evolution

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Tommy Gong has been involved with the study of jeet kune do for almost 30 years. He began his training in the art while earning his bachelor's degree at University of California, Berkeley in the 1980s. He became a certified instructor of the art in 1990 by sifu Ted Wong, who received his certification directly from Bruce Lee.

Gong, who began teaching jeet kune do under Wong's direction while earning his master's in business at San Francisco State University, was a founding board member of the Jun Fan Jeet Kune Do Nucleus/Bruce Lee Educational Foundation and currently serves as a member of the board of directors for the Bruce Lee Foundation.

Related Martial Arts Books, E-Books,
DVDs and Video Downloads

Bruce Lee: The Evolution of a Martial Artist

Bruce Lee's Fighting Method: The Complete Edition

Chinese Gung Fu: The Philosophical Art of Self-Defense — Revised and Updated

*BRUCE LEE is a registered trademark of Bruce Lee Enterprises LLC. The Bruce Lee name, image and likeness are intellectual property of Bruce Lee Enterprises LLC.

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