In this exclusive martial arts video filmed at Black Belt, former national and international grappling tournament champion and author of the best-selling The Grappler’s Handbook Vol. 1: Gi and No-Gi Techniques and The Grappler’s Handbook Vol. 2: Tactics for Defense shows you two effective finishes from the mount. Jean Jacques Machado's legendary skills in Brazilian jiu-jitsu recently garnered him a coveted red-and-black-striped belt from Brazilian jiu-jitsu icon Rickson Gracie. Machado was also recently inducted into the Black Belt Hall of Fame as its 2011 Instructor of the Year.


BRAZILIAN JIU-JITSU VIDEO Grappler's Handbook Vol. 2 Author Jean Jacques Machado Shows You Two Finishes From the Mount

"The idea in jiu-jitsu is to get into positions [and] learn how your opponent react[s]," Machado explains. "And [depending] on his reaction, I would choose a technique I want [to use] to finish him." With Grappler's Handbook co-author Jay Zeballos, Machado then moves into demonstrating two finishes from the mount position. His left hand grips the left side of Zeballos' collar, with his own right hand stabilizing for balance. Zeballos turns to the left in reaction to Machado's mat-slap noise feint, playing straight into Machado's collar grip. Machado takes advantage of the exposed right side of the collar and moves to grip it at the shoulder with his right hand, with the palm facing down. With both sides of the gi collar cross-gripped, Machado moves his elbows close to his chest and drops his head, squeezing to complete the choke.

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For the second finishing option, Machado and Zeballos start from the same position. This time, Zeballos turns away from the same collar attack while gripping Machado's left arm. This attempt to defend the hold on his collar exposes his own left arm at the elbow. Machado takes advantage by sliding his right knee past Zeballos' lifted shoulder. This positions Machado's hips behind the trapped elbow. Machado wedges his left foot under Zeballos' right shoulder and leans forward, placing his right arm on Zeballos' right shoulder for support. He then releases his grip on Zeballos' collar and raises his left arm to hook Zeballos' left arm. The armbar sets in as Machado sits back. To learn more about these and other Brazilian jiu-jitsu techniques for grappling, submission fighting and mixed martial arts, be sure to check out the two books by Jean Jacques Machado and Jay Zeballos: The Grappler’s Handbook Vol. 1: Gi and No-Gi Techniques and The Grappler’s Handbook Vol. 2: Tactics for Defense. Both are available in our online store.

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