Do you want to take a punch to the face? How about a kick to the body? No? Then you're in the right place! Second-generation Bruce Lee student Lamar M. Davis II shows you how to evade these attacks in this exclusive jeet kune do video.

Lamar Davis — the founder of and head instructor at Hardcore Jeet Kune Do as well as the executive director/senior instructor for the Hardcore Jeet Kune Do Chinese Gung Fu Association and the co-founder of the International Wing Chun/Jeet Kune Do Alliance and the Efficient Warrior Alliance — has studied and trained in Bruce Lee's art of jeet kune do for more than 30 years. He has been certified as a full/senior instructor by several of Bruce Lee's original students. In this exclusive jeet kune do video, pulled from his DVD collection Jeet Kune Do for the Advanced Practitioner, the second-generation Bruce Lee student explains and demonstrates evasive tactics in JKD moves that Bruce Lee based on boxing techniques.


Download this FREE Guide to modern jeet kune do training!
Dan Inosanto on Bruce Lee, Jeet Kune Do Techniques for Grappling and
New Directions for JKD Training

JEET KUNE DO TECHNIQUES VIDEO Lamar Davis Demonstrates Jeet Kune Do Techniques That Bruce Lee Developed From Boxing Techniques

Jeet Kune Do Techniques Based on Boxing Techniques

"Most of these movements Bruce Lee took from boxing," Lamar Davis explains in this exclusive video.

If the opponent fires lead-hand punches toward his head, Lamar Davis explains, you have the option of executing one of the basic boxing techniques adapted for JKD moves known as a "slip" (or "outside slip"). The move is simple: Move to the outside of the hand's forward trajectory — or slip to the side, out of its path.

Learn how the boxing techniques of Muhammad Ali and Joe Louis influenced Bruce Lee's development of JKD techniques in this FREE Guide! Bruce Lee Training Research: How Boxing Influenced His Jeet Kune Do Techniques

In boxing techniques, there is such a thing as an "inside slip," but the jeet kune do expert warns against it. "I prefer to slip to the outside of the arm simply because you're a little bit safer if you slip to the outside," Lamar Davis explains.

If a punch is coming straight at your face, you have the option of snapping straight back. Among boxing techniques adapted for JKD moves, this selection is called a "backward snap" or a "snap back."

Boxing Techniques Used by Jeet Kune Do Techniques Practitioners for Avoiding the Hook

"[An opponent might] fire a hook at my head," Lamar Davis says, "in which case, I duck. When I duck, I bend my knees, I drop straight down, I bring my hands up to guard my head and I look at him the whole time."

The "wrong way" to duck, Lamar Davis says, is to bend your torso forward and look downward during the movement. "When I do that, I can't see anything," he explains. "I don't know what's going on up [above] for a split second — not a good thing. That's a good time to catch an elbow or a hammerfist to the back of the head or the upper spine."

For more information about Lamar Davis and his teachings, visit the official Hardcore Jeet Kune Do Chinese Gung Fu Association website at hjkdcgfa.com.

SUBSCRIBE TO BLACKBELT MAGAZINE TODAY!
Don't miss a single issue of the world largest magazine of martial arts.

Talks About Being a Smaller Fighter in a Combat Sport Ruled by Giants

At first glance, most people — most martial artists, even — will zero in on the smaller person in any fight and deem him or her to be at a distinct disadvantage. It's a natural tendency to draw this conclusion based on obvious attributes such as height, weight and reach. However, that tendency does not always lead to accurate conclusions.

Keep Reading Show less
ONE: No Surrender II comes your way on August 14 from Bangkok, and the main event features a pair of outstanding strikers looking to advance in the ONE Bantamweight Muay Thai Tournament for their shot at Nong-O Gaiyanghadao and the ONE Bantamweight World Championship.
Keep Reading Show less

Learn a key Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu technique from world-renowned coach Ricardo Liborio.

1996 World Jiu-Jitsu Championship super heavyweight gold medalist Ricardo Liborio is the co-founder of American Top Team and is considered one of the best Jiu-Jitsu experts in the world. He is a student of Grand Master Carlson Gracie, holding a 6th degree black belt in Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu and a 2nd degree black belt in Judo.

Keep Reading Show less

Systema might not be one of the most popularly trained martial arts (at least, not within the United States), but this Russian style certainly packs a wallop! Its name simply means "The System," and that level of confidence from its creators tells you all you need to know about its efficacy. Like krav maga, Systema was developed for military use, and focuses on self-defense and real-life combat situations against armed or unarmed opponents.

Keep Reading Show less
Free Bruce Lee Guide
Have you ever wondered how Bruce Lee’s boxing influenced his jeet kune do techniques? Read all about it in this free guide.
Don’t miss a thing Subscribe to Our Newsletter