From the Archives Vol. 18, No. 6, $1.50

The 198th issue of Black Belt was dated June 1980. It was 76 pages long and featured Stephen K. Hayes on the cover.

• "To the ninja, deception is but one more weapon and is only a part of the greatest weapon of all — the mind." So says Stephen K. Hayes, ninjutsu master.

• "By presenting falsehood as truth, the ninja gets his adversary to think in one way, then approaches him from another," Hayes continues. "If we are in a close-in fighting situation, we may grab our assailant and pull him forward if our true intention is to knock him backward."


• In Sumatra, Indonesia, two silat practitioners, one 58 and the other 62, are attacked by a tiger. The men manage to kill the cat but later die from injuries sustained. Recall the Chinese proverb: "When two tigers fight, one will die, but the other will be crippled." Or die, as well.

• The editor of the mag separated the responses to the most recent reader survey into two categories: subjects most often requested and subjects most often attacked. Among the hapless victims are stories about kata, women, children and ki energy.

• Giving Bill "Superfoot" Wallace a run for his money as the frontman in ads from Century Martial Arts is karate champ John Longstreet.

• Shotokan practitioner James Field weighs in on sparring: "The right attitude, the right mind, is to concentrate on doing the correct technique — perfect technique, although reaching that is very difficult. … If you don't have the understanding of what a technique is all about, free sparring is hard to come by."

• A Marine who used to be a ballet dancer opines on the martial arts: "I've found that ballet can be just as physically demanding as karate — something most people don't realize. That illusion of ease and lightness in dancing is a direct result of incredible hard work, painful practice and a lot of sweat."

• Robert Trias holds a training op in Phoenix and attracts 66 karateka.

• "When you go to a traditional school, you adapt your body to their style. They're trying to preserve something that has been handed down for generations, so you have to adapt your body. And if your body can adapt to it, you become a killer. … But not everyone can. That's why, when I teach, I look at the student throw punches and kicks, and I try to make his own style. If he ends up looking like me, it's by coincidence." Those words come from self-defense guru Tony Blauer.

• The Summer Karate Martial Arts Tour leaves Los Angeles. The 25-day itinerary will include Seoul, South Korea; Taipei, Tainan and Taichung, Taiwan; Tokyo, Kyoto and Osaka, Japan; and Honolulu.

• An enlightened reader from South Carolina writes: "The martial arts should be viewed as a whole, with each style representing the individual pieces of a puzzle. Like leaves on a tree all joined to the same roots, so are the martial arts linked. How can martial artists claim their styles are so much better than another's when every one of the styles is essential to the arts as a whole?"
(Note: Back issues are not for sale.)


Dr. Craig's Martial Arts Movie Lounge

When The Fast and the Furious (2001) sped into the psyche's of illegal street racing enthusiasts, with a penchant for danger and the psychotic insanity of arrant automotive adventure, the brusque bearish, quasi-hero rebel, Dominic "Dom" Toretto was caustic yet salvationally portrayed with the power of a train using a Vin Diesel engine.

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The skill of stick fighting as a handy weapon dates from the prehistory of mankind. The stick has got an advantage over the stone because it could be used both for striking and throwing. In lots of countries worlwide when dealing with martial arts there is a special place for fighters skillful in stick fighting. ( India, China, Japan, Korea, New Zealand, countries of Africa, Europe and Americas etc).

The short stick as a handy weapon has been used as a means of self-defence from animals and later various attackers. Regarding its length it was better than the long stick, primarily because it was easier to carry and use. The short stick as a means of self-defence was used namely in all countries of the world long time ago.

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The Czech Republic's Lukas Krpalek put himself in the history books Friday when he became only the third judoka to ever win Olympic gold medals in two different weight categories claiming the men's +100 kg division in Tokyo. Krpalek, who won the under 100 kg class at the 2016 Rio Olympics, hit a throw with time running out in the finals against Georgia's Guram Tushishvili and went into a hold down to pin Tushishvili for the full point to earn his second Olympic championship. Meanwhile, two-time defending +100 kg champion Teddy Riner of France, considered by some the greatest judoka in history, was upset in the quarter finals and had to settle for the bronze.

On the women's side, Akira Sone helped Japan break its own record for most judo gold medals in a single Olympics when she claimed her country's ninth gold of the tournament capturing the women's +78 kg division against Cuba's Idalys Ortiz. The win came in somewhat anticlimactic fashion as no throws were landed and Ortiz lost on penalties in overtime.