Century Martial Arts CEO / Chairman of the Board Mike Dillard and two-time Black Belt Hall of Fame inductee Pat Burris (1974, 1976 Judo Player of the Year) remember the early days of their favorite martial arts magazine and the parallel paths of influence Black Belt and Century Martial Arts have had on the world of traditional and mixed martial arts since their respective inceptions. Mike Dillard is featured on the cover of the August 2011 issue of Black Belt, on sale June 21. The issue will feature his cover story, nutritional and conditioning considerations for mixed martial artists, part 2 of Harinder Singh's article on jeet kune do as the ultimate fighting system (Watch new behind-the-scenes video of jeet kune do, Brazilian jiu-jitsu and kina mutai expert Harinder Singh in action!), an exclusive interview with Frankie Edgar, the latest opinions in the ongoing "shoes vs. soles" debate, and 10 steps for executing a first-place competition form! As Black Belt's executive editor Robert Young writes in the 50th Anniversary Issue's editorial (June 2011): "I wasn't around in 1961 when Mito Uyehara was solidifying his vision for Black Belt Vol. 1 No. 1, but it must have been an exhilarating time. Small as the martial arts in America were, I doubt he had any idea he was about to make history by launching a magazine that not only would survive half a century but also would be the industry leader its entire life." Black Belt, celebrating its 50th anniversary in 2011, has remained the world's leading magazine of martial arts by, as Young goes on to write, "[covering] all the arts, even those that don't award black belts... [by focusing] on the positive---the physical, mental and spiritual benefits of training and not just self-defense and competition. That formula continues to guide us as we select and present content." And as the magazine moves forward, it continues its development of martial arts multimedia through martial arts books, martial arts DVDs and online martial arts videos! Black Belt thanks Mr. Dillard and Mr. Burris for sitting down to share their thoughts on the magazine's history, influence and 50th anniversary for this special video:


MARTIAL ARTS HISTORY VIDEO: Mike Dillard and Pat Burris Recall Black Belt Magazine's Early Days

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