Bill Wallace, known as "Superfoot," was the PKA Middleweight Champion kickboxer for nearly six years and won 23 consecutive professional fights between 1974 and 1980, and is a 10th Dan Black Belt in Shorin-Ryu Karate.

Wallace began wrestling in high school, and training judo shortly after. However, an injury to his right knee forced him to stop, and instead turn his attention to karate, which he began training while in the Air Force. After reaching success as a tournament-style competitor, he switched to full-contact fighting and netted 23 consecutive, professional fights between 1974 and 1980. His nickname, Superfoot, comes from the remarkable prowess of his left kicking leg - with some kicks clocked at 60 MPH - since his right knee never fully recovered.

Being able to kick so high and so precisely required extraordinary flexibility, which is what is covered in this stretching session!

Dr. Craig's Martial Arts Movie Lounge

When The Fast and the Furious (2001) sped into the psyche's of illegal street racing enthusiasts, with a penchant for danger and the psychotic insanity of arrant automotive adventure, the brusque bearish, quasi-hero rebel, Dominic "Dom" Toretto was caustic yet salvationally portrayed with the power of a train using a Vin Diesel engine.

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Japan continued their judo dominance at the Tokyo Olympics Monday as 2016 gold medalist Shohei Ono defended his title in the men's 73 kg division beating Georgia's Lasha Shavdatuashvili with a foot sweep in overtime to again earn the championship. On the women's side, Nora Gjakova claimed Kosovo's second judo gold of the games defeating France's Sarah-Leonie Cysique for the 57 kg title.

In taekwondo action, Croatia's Matea Jelic beat Britain's Lauren Williams 25-22 to win the women's 67 kg category while Maksim Khramtsov, representing the Russian Olympic Committee, defeated Saleh Elsharabaty of Jordan 20-9 to earn gold in the men's 80 kg class.


Epilepsy is the most common chronic neurological illness from which, according to the World Health Organization (WHO), suffers around 50 million people. Although the illness is successfully treated today, the affected are still facing discrimination and stigma because of which they oftentimes hide their illness. However, the fact is that the it does not lessen their psycho-physiological abilities or intellectual capacities.
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