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Vol. 18, No. 7, $1.50. The 199th issue of Black Belt was dated July 1980. It was 76 pages long and featured washin-ryu karate instructor Hidy Ochiai on the cover.

• Vestal, New York–based Hidy Ochiai, 40, competes in a challenge match against boxer and full-contact fighter Greg Bleir, 23. The karate master wins after a fifth-round TKO. "I do not think I did anything great, and I have no feeling of triumph — I don't see it that way," Ochiai says. "Anybody who calls himself master, they should have that kind of courage. I think you should be able to do it upon demand."

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Interested in learning more about marketing your martial arts school from someone who's "been there, done that?" David Church is a longtime martial arts school owner and instructor who has used modern marketing best practices for his school, to incredible success!

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The September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks in New York City and Washington, D.C., horrified people around the world. While we struggled to come to terms with this national tragedy, we were inspired by the actions of several passengers on United Airlines Flight 93, who decided to battle the hijackers to regain control of their doomed jet. They sacrificed their lives to ultimately save thousands of others.

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Kick it back to the 1992 U.S. Capitol Classics in Washington D.C., where a clash of sport karate legends ensued between Kevin Thompson and Pedro Xavier.

This is the fifth edition of a weekly series that features old school sport karate videos to keep the history of the sport alive. This time, instead of highlighting a single competitor and their performance, we are reflecting on a point fighting match between Kevin Thompson and Pedro Xavier, two of the greatest to ever live.

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This is the final edition of an epic five-part series that details the beginning of world-renowned swordsman Dana Abbott's training.

The everyday practice and study of kendo in a climate where the temperature reaches and exceeds 90 degrees plus applicable humidity is stifling. Japanese call this "mushi atsui", but in New York City it is just known as "muggy". Hot thick air makes the practice of any sport difficult and energy zapping. Just imagine you are in heavy cumbersome kendo gear combined with this weather. After a few hundred strikes into a workout one's lethargic body becomes immune to its surroundings and that "can't get started" feeling is diminished. Soaking wet kendo gear combined with the stench of hundreds of students doing the same thing creates a thick pungent layer of air that you could literally cut with a sword.

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Have you ever wondered how Bruce Lee’s boxing influenced his jeet kune do techniques? Read all about it in this free guide.
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