In this excerpt from The Complete Michael D. Echanis Collection, hwa rang do supreme grandmaster Dr. Joo Bang Lee's most famous student comments on what you need to know about stick combat, the human anatomy and improvised weapons!

The stick is probably the most available “field expedient” weapon to which a soldier has access. As a combat weapon, it becomes usable for everything from riot or prisoner control to an extremely lethal close-quarters-combat weapon. At one moment, the stick can be a cane and the next it can be breaking a man’s wrist, arm or neck. In this context, we will primarily deal with the stick and its use in combat as a weapon for survival. Various sizes and different techniques will give you a basis for evaluation and readjustment so that each technique will conform to you and your mental/physical abilities. Michael Echanis on Stick Combat vs. Knife Combat One important factor in your evaluation of the stick as a weapon — in contrast and in comparison to the knife — is the stick’s focus of attack on the bony protrusions and nerve centers of the human anatomy. The knife cuts and slashes veins, arteries, muscles and tendons of the body.


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Stick Combat: Learn Doce Pares Eskrima’s Most Painful Self-Defense Moves

Michael Echanis on Stick Combat and the Human Anatomy In the study of close-quarters combat and its scientific application of technique during actual attack, the focus of mental/physical contact must be directed to vital portions of the human anatomy. By simple and correct application of technique and mental focus of power, the smallest man can become a lethal weapon to the largest of assailants. A weapon in the hand of a trained individual is the integral difference between a lethal and a nonlethal close-quarters-combat technique. Michael Echanis on Improvised Weapons An example of applying common sense to this type of situation is the use of an ashtray as a lethal weapon in close-quarters combat. The edge of the glass curvature — the outer portion of the weapon — becomes the focus point of attack when directed to bony protrusions of the enemy’s anatomy such as finger joints, knuckles and bony portions of the upper hand, wrist, elbow, collarbone, jawbone, bridge of the nose or temple. A well-focused strike with this simple, commonly found weapon will deliver a disabling or extremely lethal blow in a crucial self-defense situation. The writing pen or a hardwood pencil is another example of a simple, commonly found weapon, which can be a lifesaving factor in certain life-or-death situations, such as in the face of physical violence or rape. There are many methods to injure an assailant with merely a pen, hardwood pencil, a set of keys or a comb — such as a direct thrust into the eyes, throat, jugular vein or clavicle region of the enemy. These harsh methods of reaction are necessary in life-or-death, hand-to-hand combat encounters. Only those who are willing to remain calm and act decisively will survive these types of violent encounters. Michael Echanis on How Stick-Combat Training Can Influence Use of Improvised Weapons The keys to mastering survival in close-quarters combat is common sense, being aware of readily available natural and man-made weapons in your immediate surroundings, and knowing their application of attack to vital areas of the human anatomy. It can be as simple as throwing hot coffee in the eyes of the enemy to gain that split second needed for reaction. The stick is invaluable in the sense of “common sense” and its application of attack to the anatomy of the enemy. To move forward with your study of stick combat, pick up your copy of The Complete Michael D. Echanis Collection, which features the following:
  • a vital striking chart detailing critical points of the human anatomy for effective stick combat
  • using the baton in stick combat
  • using the double short stick (also known as the "bone breaker") in stick combat
  • a special chapter on cane techniques demonstrated by hwa rang do's supreme grandmaster Dr. Joo Bang Lee
  • and much more!

Dr. Craig's Martial Arts Movie Lounge

When The Fast and the Furious (2001) sped into the psyche's of illegal street racing enthusiasts, with a penchant for danger and the psychotic insanity of arrant automotive adventure, the brusque bearish, quasi-hero rebel, Dominic "Dom" Toretto was caustic yet salvationally portrayed with the power of a train using a Vin Diesel engine.

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Host country Japan continued to run roughshod over judo at the Olympics Thursday winning both golds on day 6 of competition in Tokyo. Shori Hamada's match in the women's 78 kg division was over almost before it began as her French opponent, Madeleine Malonga, missed on an inside trip attempt just 10 seconds into the contest allowing the ground specialist, Hamada, to take it to the mat. Hamada worked her way free of Malonga's legs and into a hold down position for an easy pin to take the gold medal.

In the men's 100 kg category, Japan's Aaron Wolf waited until overtime against South Korea's Cho Gu-ham before going for his own ouchi gari, inside trip. Unlike Malonga though, Wolf, whose father is American and mother Japanese, landed his perfectly putting Cho flat on his back for an ippon, full point, to take the finals. Japan has now tied their own record for most gold medals (8) in a single Olympic judo competition with three events still to go.


There are hundreds, if not thousands of articles and advertisements, all touting the myriad of benefits children receive from studying martial arts. Let's assume the reader is already sold on the idea of having their child study martial arts, and now it's just a matter of finding the right school. As a former school owner myself, I thought I would share three things to consider when choosing a martial arts school for your child.
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