52 Blocks Video: Learn “Shuffle the Cards” from Professor Mo

Go behind the scenes at the Black Belt photo shoot that was done in New York City with Professor Mo, aka Mahaliel Bethea. This renowned martial artist is a master of the style called 52 Blocks, also known as Jailhouse Rock and "wall fighting" but more properly known as the "art of Africa."


Watch as Professor Mo teaches "shuffle the cards," a street-proven method for temporarily stripping an attacker of his ability to see, after which any number of follow-ups can be used to end the confrontation.

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To read more about 52 Blocks techniques, get a copy of the June/July 2020 issue of Black Belt. Click here to order from the Black Belt Store.

To order the issue of Black Belt with Professor Mo on the cover — and read our exclusive Q&A with the best-known 52 Blocks instructor in the world — click here. Hurry while supplies last!

Ready for more 52 Blocks information? Check out these Black Belt links!

"Professor Mo: Everything You Ever Wanted to Know About 52 Blocks"

"Learn the 'Dirty Bird' Self-Defense Technique From 52 Blocks!"

"52 Blocks: Learn 'Cover the Bullet' From Professor Mo"

"Lucky 7"

"Learn 'Roll the Dice,' a Self-Defense Technique From 52 Blocks!"

Studio photos by Peter Lueders

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The skill of stick fighting as a handy weapon dates from the prehistory of mankind. The stick has got an advantage over the stone because it could be used both for striking and throwing. In lots of countries worlwide when dealing with martial arts there is a special place for fighters skillful in stick fighting. ( India, China, Japan, Korea, New Zealand, countries of Africa, Europe and Americas etc).

The short stick as a handy weapon has been used as a means of self-defence from animals and later various attackers. Regarding its length it was better than the long stick, primarily because it was easier to carry and use. The short stick as a means of self-defence was used namely in all countries of the world long time ago.

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