Japan continued their judo dominance at the Tokyo Olympics Monday as 2016 gold medalist Shohei Ono defended his title in the men's 73 kg division beating Georgia's Lasha Shavdatuashvili with a foot sweep in overtime to again earn the championship. On the women's side, Nora Gjakova claimed Kosovo's second judo gold of the games defeating France's Sarah-Leonie Cysique for the 57 kg title.

In taekwondo action, Croatia's Matea Jelic beat Britain's Lauren Williams 25-22 to win the women's 67 kg category while Maksim Khramtsov, representing the Russian Olympic Committee, defeated Saleh Elsharabaty of Jordan 20-9 to earn gold in the men's 80 kg class.

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Over the last few months, there have been many changes. With the restrictions brought on by the pandemic lifted, most people are having to go back into their places of business for at least a few days, if not the entire week. Also, many virtual school programs are ending in favor of in-class instruction and frankly, we're all ready for it, right?
While being able to work in sweats, take Zoom meetings in the bathroom, and throw a load of clothes in the washer between client callbacks was fun for a while, returning to our pre-lockdown lives is what we've all ached for. However, that brings back some old problems with training: finding the time.

Now that we have work schedules, commutes, school pickups and dropoffs, increased in-person activities, and all those things we had previously excised from our daily routines, we have to find the time to train again. But how?

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Eighteen-year-old Anastasija Zolotic became the first American woman to win Olympic gold in taekwondo since the martial art earned full medal status in 2000 when she defeated Tatiana Minina 25-17 in the finals of the 57 kg category Sunday in Japan. Dana Hee, Arlene Limas and Lynnette Love had previously won gold for the U.S. back in 1988 when taekwondo was still considered a demonstration sport. On the men's side, Ulugbek Rashitov of Uzbekistan won the 68 kg class over Britain's Bradly Sinden 35-29.

In judo, host country Japan added to it's gold count as Uta and Hifumi Abe made Olympic history becoming the first siblings to win gold medals on the same day. Uta Abe captured the women's 52 kg division defeating France's Amandine Buchard by pin in overtime. Then Hifumi Abe earned the men's 66 kg gold hitting an osotogari, outside leg reap, for a half-point to defeat Georgia's Vazha Margvelashvili.